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51 results for "Wilson, Jim"
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Record #:
24496
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Fly-fishing has long been a popular pastime in North Carolina, particularly in the mountains. The history of the western North Carolina sport dates back to the nineteenth century.
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6899
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A long-range goal of the North Carolina Department of Marine Fisheries is to have all of the state's major fish species in a viable or recovering category within the next ten years. Currently eighteen out of the forty stocks are in these classifications. New additions are the Atlantic croaker, which moved from concerned to viable, and the monkfish, which moved from overfished to recovering.
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6890
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The 2004 North Carolina General Assembly passed legislation creating a saltwater fishing license. The issue had been debated for over a decade. Fishermen will not be required to have the license until January 1, 2006. Then residents and nonresidents who fish from the shore or a boat in the state's marine waters will be required to purchase the $15 license annually. Vacationers may purchase a seven-day license for $1.
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7008
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The National Audubon Society's first “The State of Birds” report indicates some disturbing trends for birds across the country, including several species in North Carolina. The report concentrates on 654 birds species in five major types of habitats. In North Carolina several species have declined sine 1966. These include the painted bunting, which has lost half its population; the Eastern meadowlark, down 66 percent; and Henslow's sparrow, down 90 percent.
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7198
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In Brevard, white squirrels make up about 25 percent of the total squirrel population. The animals have been protected by law within the city limits since 1986. The squirrels are not albinos; they have a gray patch on their heads, a gray dorsal stripe, and dark eyes. The squirrels exist in a number of towns east of the Mississippi. Brevard celebrates an annual White Squirrel Festival, and the local White Squirrel Shoppe sells white squirrel products, including mugs, candles, and ornaments.
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7222
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The number of wild turkeys harvested during the winter hunting season of 2005 declined from the 2004 season. There were 151 turkeys harvested in 2005, compared with 181 in 2004. Stokes County ranked first with twenty-three birds, and Person and Surry Counties reported the fewest birds with seven each. Harvest numbers reflect the participation of hunters in each county rather than the turkey populations. Overall, North Carolina's wild turkey population exceeds 130,000.
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Record #:
7353
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North Carolina generally has the largest wintering East Coast population of tundra swans. Only five states have hunting seasons for the eastern population, and North Carolina usually has the largest harvest. The first tundra swan hunting season in the state took place in 1984-1985 and 867 birds were killed. The 2004-2005 season produced the second-lowest harvest on record with 1,745 birds taken. Wilson discusses this decline in the harvest.
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Record #:
7499
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The state's ocean and coastal fisheries are showing limited signs of progress as two stocks, striped mullet and sharks, are upgraded to recovering, as reported in a stock status report from the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries. Weakfish was downgraded to overfished, and summer flounder was moved to the concerned category. The 2005 stock report lists fish in the following categories: viable, recovering, concerned, overfished, and unknown.
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Record #:
7493
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Hunters in the Northeast Hunt Zone will have a winter season for Canada geese for the first time since 1992. The zone is comprised of all or parts of eleven counties in the northeastern Coastal Plain. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had closed the zone to hunting in an attempt to allow a declining migrating population a chance to rebound. North Carolina has both a resident Canada geese population and a migratory one. The resident one now numbers over one million while the migratory remains constant at around five thousand. Wildlife biologists hope to find reasons for this through examinations of the shot geese. The wildlife service will issue only five hundred permits, and each hunter can shoot one goose.
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Record #:
7512
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The native range of the ring-necked pheasant is central Asia to China. The Greeks wrote about the bird in the tenth century B.C. For centuries people have relocated the bird around the world. The first attempt in North America was in 1733, but it was not until 1881 that the first permanent colony of these pheasants was established in Oregon. The ring-necked pheasant is one of the country's most sought-after game birds. Between 1928 and 1931, the North Carolina Wildlife Commission released about 5,000 of them on the mainland, and hunting clubs on the Outer Banks released another 175 between 1931 and 1935. Wilson discusses the history of the pheasant in North Carolina.
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Record #:
7491
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The periauger was flat-bottomed, dugout workboat in the state's waterways during the 18th- and early 19th-centuries that disappeared in the first half of the 19th-century. Improved roadways, the opening of more railroad lines, and the steamboat contributed to its demise. Archaeologists have yet to find the remains of a vessel of this type in the state. In 2004, a group of marine historians successfully planned, built, and sailed a reproduction of periauger. Wilson discusses the project.
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Record #:
7574
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The annual summer brood survey of wild turkeys, conducted by North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission biologists, found that the state had its second-poorest hatch ever in 2005. Only 53 percent of the hens had young turkeys. The worst year was 2003, when only 51 percent of the hens had young. Wilson discuses reasons for this and what effect the small birthrate will have on the hunting season.
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Record #:
7622
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Quail Forever was founded in the summer of 2005 by Pheasants Forever, a conservation group with over twenty years experience in maintaining and restoring pheasant habitats. The first chapter of Quail Forever in North Carolina was formed by sportsmen in the southern Coastal Plain. The chapter will focus its efforts on improving quail habitats in the area's public lands.
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Record #:
7964
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is acquiring over 65,000 acres of land from the International Paper Corp. The land consists mostly of bottomland forests, floodplains, and wetlands, making them valuable for water quality protection. Several tracts contain rare and endangered plants and animals. Most of the land lies in the northeastern and southeastern sections of the state.
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Record #:
7753
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The side-by-side barreled shotgun is traditionally associated with wing shooting. This gun has been around since the late 18th-century, and the modern over-and-under barreled gun was developed about a hundred years later. American gun makers now sell more over-and-under guns, and Wilson compares the two, seeking to answer the question, when accuracy is at issue, which is the better gun?
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