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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for American chestnut
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Record #:
7019
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1915, the world's largest recorded chestnut tree stood in Haywood County and measured seventeen feet in diameter. Today, North Carolina's largest recorded chestnut stands at Wayah Bald and measures sixteen inches around. In the intervening years, chestnut trees in the Appalachian region were nearly wiped out by a devastating blight. In Asheville, a branch of the American Chestnut Foundation is working to restore these once-mighty trees to the forests.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 9, Feb 2005, p120-125, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9969
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Once the American chestnut spread from the East Coast to the Mississippi River; however, a blight in the early 1930s virtually wiped the tree out.
Record #:
17321
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once the American chestnut spread from the East Coast to the Mississippi River. The trees grew one hundred feet or more. They grew straight for the first fifty feet and produced great timber. The nuts were a cash crop that western North Carolinians sold at Christmastime. However, in 1904 scientists discovered the blight in New York City that by 1950 had destroyed about four billion chestnut trees. It is considered the largest ecological disaster of the 20th century.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p154-156, 158, 160, 162-163, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24114
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Less than a hundred years ago, Asheville was filled with American chestnut trees. Today, few trees remain. One organization, the American Chestnut Foundation, seeks to change that by working to develop a tree that can survive blight and thrive in the area.
Record #:
24716
Author(s):
Abstract:
Within a few years, one of the state’s most valuable natural resources was wiped out because of a blight; the American chestnut was utterly lost. The author discusses this incident and how a new hybrid could possibly replace the loss in forests.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 50, May 1952, p13, 19, il
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Record #:
2796
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before most were killed by a blight in the early 20th-century, the American chestnut spread from the East Coast to the Mississippi River. Because the roots survived, many botanists feel a method will be found to bring the trees back.
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Record #:
8683
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Abstract:
Once covering nine million acres in the eastern United States and Ohio River Valley, the American chestnut was virtually eliminated by an Asian fungus blight in the 1900s. The National Wild Turkey Federation (NWTF) and The American Chestnut Foundation (TACF) are working together to plant blight-resistant chestnut trees. The chestnut was an important food source for wild turkeys. The restoration of the chestnut is a long-term project. The new tree in development will have the blight resistance of the Chinese chestnut and the physical appearance of the American chestnut.
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Record #:
36456
Author(s):
Abstract:
Joining sustainability efforts is the nonprofit American Chestnut Foundation. Factors assuring their sustainability success included partnerships with universities possessing cutting edge technological tools, a successful breeding program at Meadowview Research Farms, and advocacy of volunteers and members known familiarly as “chestnutters.”