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10 results for Chestnut blight
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Record #:
9969
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Once the American chestnut spread from the East Coast to the Mississippi River; however, a blight in the early 1930s virtually wiped the tree out.
Record #:
13799
Author(s):
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Within a few years, one of the state's most valuable natural resources was utterly wiped out, but a new hybrid chestnut tree may partially replace the loss in forests.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 49, May 1952, p13, 19, f
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Record #:
17321
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once the American chestnut spread from the East Coast to the Mississippi River. The trees grew one hundred feet or more. They grew straight for the first fifty feet and produced great timber. The nuts were a cash crop that western North Carolinians sold at Christmastime. However, in 1904 scientists discovered the blight in New York City that by 1950 had destroyed about four billion chestnut trees. It is considered the largest ecological disaster of the 20th century.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p154-156, 158, 160, 162-163, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24114
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Less than a hundred years ago, Asheville was filled with American chestnut trees. Today, few trees remain. One organization, the American Chestnut Foundation, seeks to change that by working to develop a tree that can survive blight and thrive in the area.
Record #:
24716
Author(s):
Abstract:
Within a few years, one of the state’s most valuable natural resources was wiped out because of a blight; the American chestnut was utterly lost. The author discusses this incident and how a new hybrid could possibly replace the loss in forests.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 50, May 1952, p13, 19, il
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Record #:
2796
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Abstract:
Before most were killed by a blight in the early 20th-century, the American chestnut spread from the East Coast to the Mississippi River. Because the roots survived, many botanists feel a method will be found to bring the trees back.
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Record #:
28533
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Abstract:
The American Chestnut Foundation is working to restore the chestnut tree to America. The conditions for the tree’s disappearance are detailed along with the foundation's breeding program. The foundation is breeding hybrid chestnut trees and has had some success. Their work and their mission are described.
Record #:
30872
Author(s):
Abstract:
American chestnut trees were plentiful in the Appalachian forest, until the chestnut blight disease caused a rapid, widespread die-off in the early part of the twentieth century. Farmers and volunteers in western North Carolina are working with the American Chestnut Foundation to plant, grow and re-establish chestnut trees in the state’s forests.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 12, Dec 2009, p14-15, il, por
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Record #:
34963
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The American Chestnut tree once grew all up and down the east coast, until a blight nearly wiped out the species. Today, the Green Park Inn of Blowing Rock stands as a testament to that time, restoring their chestnut wood handicrafts, serving food on chestnut planks, and naming their restaurant the Chestnut Grille.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p162-168, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
40505
Author(s):
Abstract:
Henry Bacon introduced an architectural design that transformed a town that investors like Donald MacRae envisioned as a mining and timber hub. Courtesy of bark shingled buildings, that Smith notes defines the town, Linville became a resort and retreat mecca. Evidence of the style’s enduring appeal can be seen in All Saints Episcopal Church and Eseeola Lodge.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 87 Issue 5, October 2019, p84-88, 90, 92, 94, 96 Periodical Website