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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for "Umberger, Winslow"
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Record #:
39407
Author(s):
Abstract:
September is the peak of the Broad-winged Hawk migration. According to Bill Sanderson, founder of the Mount Pisgah Hawk Watch, it's a very weather dependent migration. The Mills River Valley Overlook is ideal for watching the migration.
Source:
Laurel of Asheville (NoCar F 264 A8 L28), Vol. 15 Issue 9, Sept. 2019, p62-63
Record #:
40700
Author(s):
Abstract:
Most people do not realize that the food they may throw out of their car to sit on the roadside can have dire consequences for wildlife. It can create a chain reaction that results in the death or injury of wildlife.
Source:
Laurel of Asheville (NoCar F 264 A8 L28), Vol. 14 Issue 10, , p84-85
Record #:
41181
Author(s):
Abstract:
Largely due to their appearance, opossums are seen as worthless vermin. In all actuality, however, it is quite the opposite. Opossums are mostly immune to diseases, such as rabies, and eat up animals like beetles, snails, rodents, slugs, and roadkill. These smart and useful animals should be encouraged, and not feared.
Source:
Record #:
41229
Author(s):
Abstract:
As one of the few mammals that doesn’t hibernate in the winter, foxes are active and largely nocturnal. While seeing a fox is not a cause of alarm, as long as a respectful distance is kept, if persistent sightings cause the viewer worry or distress, the a visit to the NC Wildlife Resources commission website or a call to the Appalachian Wildlife Refuge can be useful.
Source:
Record #:
42621
Author(s):
Abstract:
While keeping a neat and trim lawn might make you happy, the opposite can be said for the wildlife that may live there. Animals such as turtles, rabbits, and birds can get injured from lawn mowing and sprayed chemical pesticides. Consider creating an area in your yard as a safe space for animals to live, and natural growth to occur.
Source:
Laurel of Asheville (NoCar F 264 A8 L28), Vol. 15 Issue 6, June 2018, p84-85
Subject(s):
Record #:
42604
Author(s):
Abstract:
The popular saying that animals will abandon their young if they scent human contact, is indeed, a myth. Replacing a baby bird to a nest will not cause the parents to abandon it, but handling or moving young animals should not be a decision taken lightly; in most instances the parents leave for long period of time to gather food for themselves and their young before returning.
Source:
Laurel of Asheville (NoCar F 264 A8 L28), Vol. 15 Issue 5, May 2018, p50-51