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22 results for "Simpson, Bland"
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Record #:
32204
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An excerpt from North Carolina author Bland Simpson’s “Two Captains from Carolina” highlights a pivotal moment for Moses Grandy, an accomplished African American mariner born in the antebellum South. Simpson describes how he brought to life the stories of two disparate captains and what their narratives mean to him.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2018, p12-17, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
3183
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Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge, lying at the eastern end of Carteret County, holds 10,000 acres of the largest unchanged salt marsh in the state.
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Record #:
39439
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Barbara Garrity-Blake is the co-leader of the Down East Cajun and acoustic-roots band the Unknown Tongues and founder of the annual folk-feast at the Gloucester Mardi Gras.
Record #:
22100
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Boatbuilding in Eastern North Carolina dates back thousands of years to cypress dugout canoes (ca.2,400 BCE) found in the waters of Lake Phelps. Simpson recounts boat types, how they were used, and the men who built them.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, May 2014, p80-82, 84, 86-117, il Periodical Website
Record #:
5358
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The Red Clay Ramblers, the state's celebrated mountain-and-roots string band, is marking thirty years of performing in 2002. Simpson, one of the band's original members, discusses the musical group's successes, performing, and fellowship over that interval.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 2, July 2002, p60-62, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
38298
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Called sound country by the author, North Carolina attained this status by having more sounds than any other state in the east. Its importance may be better defined, however, by the role that sounds like Currituck have played in defining a way of life for Eastern North Carolinians and the region’s seafood industry for centuries.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p96-98, 100, 102-104, 106, 108, 110, 112, 114 Periodical Website
Record #:
10507
Author(s):
Abstract:
Midway Plantation in Knightdale was built on a 1739 land grant from Lord Granville and has remained in the family since then. The house was film critic Godfrey Cheshire's mother's home and is now in possession of his first cousin. With Knightdale growing and a highway encroaching on the house, the family decided the only way to save it was to move it. Cheshire made a movie of the move titled Moving Midway. Simpson discusses the film.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 38, Sept 2008, p45, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
2169
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The town of Chapel Hill grew up around well-preserved woods, now called Battle's Park, mainly because Kemp Battle, president of the University of North Carolina, loved and walked the tract over 130 years ago. The area was preserved in Battle's honor.
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Record #:
37642
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Clay was the stuff potsherds were made of, evidence for the lifeways of North Carolina inhabitants over the centuries. Places the author celebrated and commemorated included Fort Neoheroka, Town Creek, Soco Creek, and Seagrove.
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Record #:
5388
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The treacherous Diamond Shoals off the North Carolina coastline have claimed many ships. In 1921, the Carroll A. Deering fell victim to them. The crew vanished without a trace; only three ship's cats were found. The incident remains one of the state's maritime mysteries.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 5, Oct 2002, p104-109, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26395
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Bland Simpson is the author of a new book called Sound Country: A Carolinian’s Coastal Plain. Sound Country is the North Carolina region encompassing the five major and ten minor sounds. Bland offers his observations of how ecosystems in the coastal region have changed.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue (44)4, Fall 1997, p8-9, il
Record #:
24815
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Rachel Carson came to the North Carolina coast in 1947 and documented much of the coastal area she explored. Much of what she described can still be found and explored today from Bird Shoal to Taylor’s Creek.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2016, p6-13, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
4350
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Northwest of Wilmington, between the confluence of the Cape Fear and Black rivers, lies Roan Island, 2,757 acres of swampy ground. It is accessible only by boat and has such wildlife as alligators, bears, deer, and wild turkeys. The Nature Conservancy purchased the island in 1998 and then turned it over to the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission to manage. Today it is one of the commission's newest game lands.
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Record #:
25581
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For the first time since the 1830s, the leaders of the 55,000-member Cherokee Nation and the 9,000-member Eastern Band of Cherokees met in joint council at Red Clay, TN. The divided people gathered to petition Congress, get the business world to notice their resources of land and labor, make friends, and make peace with the past.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 7, April 13-26 1984, p1, 14-15, por Periodical Website