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11 results for Tuscarora Indians--North Carolina
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Record #:
794
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John Lawson, surveyor of and explorer in North Carolina, had extensive dealings and encounters with the Tuscarora Indians of North Carolina; he eventually died at the hands of the Tuscaroras.
Record #:
13128
Author(s):
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This article by the late Chief Justice, was first published in the \"North Carolina Booklet,\" July, 1902. Many reasons were assigned as to why bloody outbreak of Indians occurred in 1711 including, the steady encroachment of whites on hunting grounds, conflicts between whites themselves, or instigation by outside parties. The Indians could muster quite a number of men and were lead mostly by the Tuscaroras on the 22nd of September.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 12, Nov 1955, p9-11, 24, il
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Record #:
13601
Abstract:
There were numerous tribes scattered throughout the State, ranging from the powerful Tuscaroras in the eastern area to the Cherokees of the west.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 7, July 1951, p7, 18, f
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Record #:
21133
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Abstract:
The tale of English explorer John Lawson and his relationship with the Tuscarora Indian tribe of North Carolina is one of tragedy and violence. What began with mutual respect and friendship between the two ended with Lawson's gruesome death at the hand of the Tuscarora in 1711. Lawson's journey through the New World, particularly what is now North Carolina, provided an insight into many Indian tribes and their culture. Lawson's death helped spark the Tuscarora War, a conflict that between Indian and colonist that ended with the almost extinction of the Tuscarora as a people.
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Record #:
21134
Author(s):
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The Tuscarora War was an armed conflict between English colonists and the Tuscarora Indian tribe that ended with the near extinction of the Tuscarora. Angered by colonial encroachment on their land and broken promises, the Tuscarora launched surprise attacks on North Carolina colonists. A combined North Carolina and South Carolina militia fought back against the Tuscarora and destroyed most of its people and villages.
Record #:
21135
Abstract:
Neoheroka Fort was the location of the last Tuscarora stronghold during the Tuscarora War and site of the last major battle. Never reoccupied after it was razed by colonial forces, it is now a time capsule of Tuscarora culture during the final moments of its existence.
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Record #:
21955
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Abstract:
This article discusses the massacre, perpetrated by the Tuscaroras and their allies on 22 September 1711, which led to the death of hundreds of English settlers and the subsequent Tuscarora War. By March 1712, militia from North Carolina and South Carolina defeated the Tuscarora at their last stronghold at Snow Hill, North Carolina.
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Record #:
34474
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The Carteret County Historical Society houses reproductions of drawings of Roanoke Island made by John White in 1585. White studied the Algonquin and Tuscarora Indians, and the subjects he depicted include fishing and agricultural practices, burial customs, personal adornment, and village construction. Scans of the drawings are included.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p9-10, il
Record #:
36122
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, the Tuscarora was one of the six Indian groups whose arrival preceded Europeans by many centuries. The 1713 battle in New Bern yielding the massacre of nine hundred, and knelled their way of life. As for who initiated this battle, it is certain. Was it Europeans wanting the land? Was it other Indian groups wanting to destroy them?
Record #:
37642
Author(s):
Abstract:
Clay was the stuff potsherds were made of, evidence for the lifeways of North Carolina inhabitants over the centuries. Places the author celebrated and commemorated included Fort Neoheroka, Town Creek, Soco Creek, and Seagrove.
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Record #:
40422
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Abstract:
A Native American tribe has endured racial and ethnic bias in Robeson since their arrival in the mid-eighteenth century. This enduring spirit could have contributed to their successful contention with the Klu Klux Klan in 1958, a nationally recognized that helped paved the way for their present national and local political prowess.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 87 Issue 3, August 2019, p138-140, 142, 144 Periodical Website