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12 results for Clark, Walter
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Record #:
10878
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Abstract:
Clark discusses the origin of North Carolina's motto, \"Esse Quam Videri,\" which means \"to be rather than to seem.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 18, Feb 1968, p15-15, il
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Record #:
13128
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This article by the late Chief Justice, was first published in the \"North Carolina Booklet,\" July, 1902. Many reasons were assigned as to why bloody outbreak of Indians occurred in 1711 including, the steady encroachment of whites on hunting grounds, conflicts between whites themselves, or instigation by outside parties. The Indians could muster quite a number of men and were lead mostly by the Tuscaroras on the 22nd of September.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 12, Nov 1955, p9-11, 24, il
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Record #:
21955
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This article discusses the massacre, perpetrated by the Tuscaroras and their allies on 22 September 1711, which led to the death of hundreds of English settlers and the subsequent Tuscarora War. By March 1712, militia from North Carolina and South Carolina defeated the Tuscarora at their last stronghold at Snow Hill, North Carolina.
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Record #:
22058
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This article describes a 1775 scheme to acquire, settle, and hold a large piece of land, called \"Transylvania County,\" lying between the Kentucky and Cumberland rivers, in what is now Tennessee and Kentucky. Details include Boonesborough's establishment by a group of men led by North Carolina Judge Richard Henderson and frontiersman Daniel Boone. A reprint of Henderson's journal documenting his journey into this territory is included.
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Record #:
22064
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This article details the 1740 Cartagena Expedition, an assault on Spanish colonies in South America. Forces consisted of 12,000 English troops and 3,600 troops from England's North American colonies including 400 North Carolinians. The expedition failed and resulted in the deaths of almost the entire North Carolina regiment along with majority of the English and Colonial ground forces.
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Record #:
22481
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This address given at the presentation of the portrait of Major General Stephen D. Ramseur to the Memorial Association, was given by Chief Justice Walter McKenzie Clark. In the address, Clark recalls the day North Carolina declared independence from the Union and joined the Confederacy, and the presence of Stephen Dodson Ramseur, then a captain of artillery who within three years, rose to the rank of Major General and who died leading his men at Cedar Creek, Virginia.
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Record #:
22474
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William Alexander Graham was born in Lincoln County, North Carolina in 1804. Graham achieve much in the way of public service during his lifetime becoming Speaker of the House of Commons, Governor of North Carolina, Secretary of the United States Navy, Senator of the United States, Senator of the Confederate States, and nominee of the Whig Party for the Vice Presidency.
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Record #:
22529
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This short collection publishes, possibly for the first time, several letters and documents pursuant to a gathering in Palmyra, Halifax County, North Carolina which planned to declare for secession prior to South Carolina's declaration in 1860.
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Record #:
22551
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It is argued that the term 'Pickett's Charge,' referring to the movements of General George Pickett during the Battle of Gettysburg during the American Civil War, is actually a misnomer. As Pickett only commanded 3 brigades and 15 regiments, the phrase should give attention to General Longstreet, whose command led the charge according to official reports.
Record #:
32239
Author(s):
Abstract:
The late Chief Justice Walter Clarke gives a detailed description of the part North Carolina’s troops played in the battle of Gettysburg. This article is the second part of a piece published in The North Carolina Booklet.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 13, Nov 1958, p11-12, il
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Record #:
32238
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Abstract:
The late Chief Justice Walter Clarke gives a detailed description of the part North Carolina’s troops played in the battle of Gettysburg. This article is the first part of a piece published in The North Carolina Booklet.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 12, Nov 1958, p13-14, il
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Record #:
32380
Author(s):
Abstract:
The late Chief Justice Walter Clarke gives a detailed description of the part North Carolina’s troops played in the battle of Gettysburg. This article is the final part of a piece published in The North Carolina Booklet.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 14, Nov 1958, p13-14
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