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7 results for Ramseur, Stephen Dodson, 1837-1864
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Record #:
3319
Abstract:
Born in Lincoln County in 1837, Robert Johnston, Robert Hoke, and Stephen Ramseur little knew their boyhood war games would become reality when they saw service as Confederate army generals in the Civil War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 56 Issue 9, Feb 1989, p6-9, por
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Record #:
8167
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Abstract:
University of Virginia professor Gary Gallagher writes about Stephen Dodson Ramseur and his love Ellen “Nellie” Richmond. Ramseur grew up in Lincolnton and attended the United States Military Academy. He was a member of the last full class to graduate before the Civil War. When war broke out Ramseur resigned his commission and joined the Confederate Army. He quickly rose in rank, becoming the youngest West Point graduate to become a Confederate major general. Ramseur fought at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Cold Harbor, Shenandoah Valley, and Cedar Creek. Ramseur married Ellen in 1863. On September 16, 1864, he received word that Ellen had given birth to a child, but the message did not describe the baby's sex or health. Ramseur never found out, he was killed in battle two days later at Cedar Creek. Ellen remained in deep mourning the remainder of her life
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 5, Oct 1984, p4, il, por
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Record #:
12947
Abstract:
Memorialized by a monument erected in his honor in 1921, Stephen D. Ramseur, the youngest major general in the Confederate Army, died during the Battle of Cedar Creek Virginia, 19 October 1864.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 24, Apr 1960, p12, por
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Record #:
17119
Author(s):
Abstract:
Probably no other officer in any American army had as rapid rise in rank as Stephen Ramseur. He began his service with the Confederate Army in April 1861 as a 2nd Lieutenant and he was a Major General when he was mortally wounded at the Battle of Cedar Creek, Virginia, October 19, 1864.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 18, Oct 1938, p23
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Record #:
18177
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lincolnton sent three generals to the Civil War--Robert F. Hoke, Robert D. Johnson, and Stephen D. Ramseur. All three were wounded and one died from his wounds. Hoke was wounded at Chancellorsville, Johnson was wounded at Seven Pines and Spotsylvania, and Ramseur was wounded at Malvern Hill and fatally wounded at Cedar Creek. Lawrence recounts Ramseur's Civil War career.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 37, Feb 1941, p9, 18
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Record #:
22481
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Abstract:
This address given at the presentation of the portrait of Major General Stephen D. Ramseur to the Memorial Association, was given by Chief Justice Walter McKenzie Clark. In the address, Clark recalls the day North Carolina declared independence from the Union and joined the Confederacy, and the presence of Stephen Dodson Ramseur, then a captain of artillery who within three years, rose to the rank of Major General and who died leading his men at Cedar Creek, Virginia.
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Record #:
14383
Abstract:
Providing military leaders was one of the many contributions North Carolina made to the Confederate cause. Almost three dozen men served as generals of various ranks. Barefoot focuses on two of them - Robert F. Hoke and Stephen Dodson Ramseur. Born four days and thirty miles apart in 1837, they were friends for life, but each met different fates. Hoke survived the war as the state's top general, but Ramseur was killed in the fighting in the Shenandoah Valley.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 2, Spring 2011, p30-33, il, por