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7 results for North Carolina--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Generals
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Record #:
18309
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Cox, a native of Halifax County, was a lawyer, agriculturalist, distinguished Civil War general, Congressman, and civic leader. Among the battles he participated in were Malvern Hill, Sharpsburg, Chancellorsville, and the Valley Campaign. He was wounded eleven times.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 14, Sept 1941, p5, 18-19
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Record #:
18543
Author(s):
Abstract:
Matt and Robert Ransom are the only two brothers in the state's history who became Major General in the Confederate Army. They were also distinguished in other lines of work before and after the Civil War, including lawyer, civil engineer, U.S. Cavalry officer, and U.S. Senator.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 48, May 1942, p3, 22
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Record #:
20653
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lawrence provides a summary of the generals from North Carolina who rendered valiant service during the War Between the States, including Holmes, Hill, Ransom, Pender, Hoke, and Ramseur.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 52, May 1946, p6-7, 25
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Record #:
20766
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bragg was the only North Carolinian to achieve the full rank of general during the Civil War. Many controversies remain in connection with the campaigns he waged. No one could doubt his courage, but his greatest liability was his failure to follow-up his success on the battlefield and reap the fruits of victory at places like Perryville, Kentucky and Chattanooga, Tennessee.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 32, Jan 1947, p9, 18-19
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Record #:
21317
Abstract:
Alexander explores the brief but eventful life of Lawrence O'Bryan Branch. He studied law at Cambridge Law School and practiced law in Florida. There he served six months fighting the Seminole Indians. He returned home in 1848 and set up a practice in Raleigh and became involved in politics. The bulk of the article consists of his service at the Civil War in which he was a General. He was in the fight at New Bern, campaigned in Virginia, fought in the Seven Days Battle and at Cedar Mountain, and later Manassas, Harper's Ferry and Sharpsburg, where he was killed.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Win 2000, p13-16, il, por, bibl
Record #:
14383
Abstract:
Providing military leaders was one of the many contributions North Carolina made to the Confederate cause. Almost three dozen men served as generals of various ranks. Barefoot focuses on two of them - Robert F. Hoke and Stephen Dodson Ramseur. Born four days and thirty miles apart in 1837, they were friends for life, but each met different fates. Hoke survived the war as the state's top general, but Ramseur was killed in the fighting in the Shenandoah Valley.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 2, Spring 2011, p30-33, il, por
Record #:
28665
Abstract:
William MacRae of Wilmington, North Carolina was a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army during the Civil War. MacRae’s most dramatic service was victory at the 1864 Battle of Reams Station.
Source:
Lower Cape Fear Historical Society Bulletin (NoCar F 262 C2 L6x), Vol. 29 Issue 3, May 1986, p1-7, il, por, map, f
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