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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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26 results for "Pusser, Todd"
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Record #:
14323
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The world's waters contain almost 32,000 species of fish. There are 235 freshwater species living in North Carolina waters, including six that are found nowhere else in the world. It is uncertain how many marine species are found here. Pusser highlights some of the unique diversity.
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Record #:
16814
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In this ongoing series, Pusser has highlighted the unique diversity of life found within the state's borders. In this segment he focuses on birds. Scientists currently recognize over 10,150 species worldwide. Of that number North Carolina claims 460 species which are either permanent or seasonal residents.
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Record #:
19473
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Millions of years ago, one of the mightiest predators on Earth, the megalodon, swam off the coast of North Carolina. Now evidence of these predators exists in rivers and coastal areas in the form of large teeth.
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Record #:
27668
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Bluefin Tuna is an extraordinary fish that is among the world’s most endangered species. This article discusses the Bluefin’s way of life, its habitat, and migration patterns.
Record #:
28439
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The raccoon’s intelligence, flexibility, and social network have helped it become a successful and resilient mammal. Raccoons are also one of the primary vectors for rabies in North Carolina. As raccoons continue to be a part of the rural and urban landscapes, people should be cautious in areas where they are common.
Record #:
34398
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Biologist Susan Campbell has been banding and studying ruby-throated hummingbirds in North Carolina for over twenty years. Her research has shown that these hummingbirds usually return to the same location every spring. More and more hummingbirds have been found overwintering along the coast, especially in the Outer Banks, due to warmer climate and plentiful food.
Record #:
34716
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North Carolina hosts approximately 31 National Champion trees listed on the Big Tree Program. Species include the longleaf pine, water oak, flowering dogwood, bald cypress, and silky camellia. Also detailed is the process of finding these champion trees and how two men have added significantly to the list.
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Record #:
34719
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Whale sharks are occasional visitors to the coast of North Carolina, especially when warmer-than-average water travels up from the south. In 1934, a whale shark larger than 40 feet long was found dead in the Cape Fear River; Herbert Hutchinson Brimley, affiliate of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, was able to record the tail and create part of an exhibition. Since then, the whale shark has become a much more active part of the North Carolina ecosystem.
Record #:
36163
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In the briny deep of the Outer Banks and waterways such as streams was a diversity of tropic and cool water life. This diversity’s attribution was in part to the Labrador Current and Gulf Stream. Displaying the diversity were the ocean’s sand tiger sharks and nettle jellyfish, the river’s largemouth bass and waterdog.
Record #:
21728
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Stretching from the mountains to the coast, the state contains a diversity of wildlife and habitat. This includes the American alligator, the Southern flying squirrel, and elk herds. Brotak states that analyzing the climate of a particular region requires a close look at temperature and precipitation. \"These two elements to a large extent control the type of vegetation found in an area and therefore also determine the wildlife found there.\" The article includes maps showing normal precipitation and normal mean temperatures from 1971-2000.