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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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26 results for "Pusser, Todd"
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Record #:
36163
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In the briny deep of the Outer Banks and waterways such as streams was a diversity of tropic and cool water life. This diversity’s attribution was in part to the Labrador Current and Gulf Stream. Displaying the diversity were the ocean’s sand tiger sharks and nettle jellyfish, the river’s largemouth bass and waterdog.
Record #:
34398
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Biologist Susan Campbell has been banding and studying ruby-throated hummingbirds in North Carolina for over twenty years. Her research has shown that these hummingbirds usually return to the same location every spring. More and more hummingbirds have been found overwintering along the coast, especially in the Outer Banks, due to warmer climate and plentiful food.
Record #:
28439
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The raccoon’s intelligence, flexibility, and social network have helped it become a successful and resilient mammal. Raccoons are also one of the primary vectors for rabies in North Carolina. As raccoons continue to be a part of the rural and urban landscapes, people should be cautious in areas where they are common.
Record #:
25516
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During the early 1970s, North Carolina joined the Big Tree Program. The goal of the program is to preserve and promote the iconic stature of the trees and educate people about the role they play in sustaining a healthy environment. Each individual state maintains a list of the largest trees found and names them as state champion trees. If the state champion trees are large enough, they may quality for the Register. Currently, there are 31 North Carolina National Champion trees listed on the Register.
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Record #:
25521
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In 1934, Herbert Brimley examined remains of a whale shark found in Carolina Beach, North Carolina. Despite an increase of knowledge since that discovery, still not much is known about whale sharks. Scientists do not know where whale sharks give birth, or how many are in the ocean, or even how long they live.
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Record #:
27668
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Bluefin Tuna is an extraordinary fish that is among the world’s most endangered species. This article discusses the Bluefin’s way of life, its habitat, and migration patterns.
Record #:
34716
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North Carolina hosts approximately 31 National Champion trees listed on the Big Tree Program. Species include the longleaf pine, water oak, flowering dogwood, bald cypress, and silky camellia. Also detailed is the process of finding these champion trees and how two men have added significantly to the list.
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Record #:
34719
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Whale sharks are occasional visitors to the coast of North Carolina, especially when warmer-than-average water travels up from the south. In 1934, a whale shark larger than 40 feet long was found dead in the Cape Fear River; Herbert Hutchinson Brimley, affiliate of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, was able to record the tail and create part of an exhibition. Since then, the whale shark has become a much more active part of the North Carolina ecosystem.
Record #:
23073
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North Carolina is home to a variety of insects, fish, birds, and other animals that perform amazing natural spectacles. Tourists travel hundreds of miles to see such spectacles, but one only needs to know when and where to look to see nature at its finest.
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Record #:
23920
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Red-tailed Hawks are common throughout North Carolina, even in the state's large cities. The birds are spectacular and seem to be increasing in number, but are still in danger of birds-of-prey hunters.
Record #:
23946
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The Albemarle Peninsula is a wetland located between the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds. The peninsula covers 3,200 square miles of land in five different counties. The wetland environment is home to a variety of wildlife, including bobcats, black bears, red wolves, tundra swans, river otters, snake species, and the American Alligator, among others.
Record #:
21728
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Stretching from the mountains to the coast, the state contains a diversity of wildlife and habitat. This includes the American alligator, the Southern flying squirrel, and elk herds. Brotak states that analyzing the climate of a particular region requires a close look at temperature and precipitation. \"These two elements to a large extent control the type of vegetation found in an area and therefore also determine the wildlife found there.\" The article includes maps showing normal precipitation and normal mean temperatures from 1971-2000.
Record #:
22393
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Located in Columbus County, Lake Waccamaw covers an area of 9,000 square acres along with 14 miles of cypress-lined shoreline. It is the third-largest natural lake in the state, but its depth only averages 3 feet. It is a place of great diversity, both in and out of the water. In the forest and swamps surrounding Waccamaw are Prothonotary warblers, black bear, pine lily, river otters, Venus flytraps, spotted turtles and brown water snakes. Also in the lake's waters there are three endemics--three small species of fish--that are found nowhere else on the planet. They are a darter, a killfish, and a silverside. Adding to the diversity, the skull of an extinct right whale 2.5 million-year-old was found in 2007.
Record #:
19473
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Millions of years ago, one of the mightiest predators on Earth, the megalodon, swam off the coast of North Carolina. Now evidence of these predators exists in rivers and coastal areas in the form of large teeth.
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