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Record #:
8518
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Abstract:
Asheville was one of nine cities honored with the prestigious 2006 Awards for Municipal Excellence at the National League of Cities' Congress of Cities in Reno, Nevada, on December 8, 2006. The award recognizes cities that improve the quality of life in their communities. Asheville was the Gold winner in the 50,501-150,000 population category for its “Cultural Renaissance Arts Program.” This innovative summer and after-school arts and humanities program focuses on young people ages 8-15 and provides a platform to address social issues through theatrical productions, visual arts exhibits and dance recitals.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 57 Issue 1, Jan 2007, p12, il
Record #:
8594
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In 1999, the flood that followed Hurricane Floyd destroyed all four buildings of Rocky Mount's Children's Museum and the city's Art Centre. In choosing a new location in the downtown area, the city selected the old Imperial Tobacco Factory and the former Braswell Memorial Library. The Imperial Centre, which opened in January 2006, is home to the Children's Museum, the Arts Center, and a planetarium that will open in March 2006.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 56 Issue 2, Feb 2006, p8-9, il
Record #:
8595
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The Harry W. Suddreth family of Gaston County is North Carolina's new Farmers Home Administration Farm Family of the Year. The award is presented to the FHA farm family that demonstrates the most outstanding achievements in the state in farm methods, financial progress, family living, property investment, and resourcefulness in overcoming adversities. The Suddreths bought their 107-acre farm in 1962, and in 1964, began concentrating on greenhouse plant culture. In 1975, their nursery enterprise grossed $186,000.
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Record #:
8612
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Abstract:
The world's largest windmill stands atop Howard's Knob in Watauga County, ready to generate electricity. On Roanoke Sound at Nags Head, Lynanne Wescott of Manteo is building a windmill based on a 19th-century design. The 35-foot windmill is authentic down to the hand-forged metal work and wooden parts that were cut with the old style tools. Handcut wooden nails join pieces of the structure together. Total cost for the project is $250,000. Wescott hopes the windmill will be a tourist attraction and a moneymaker. The windmill will be used to grind grain, and visitors will be able to view the entire process. Windmills of this type were part of North Carolina's coastal life in the early 1700s, but fell into disuse by the end of the 19th-century.
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Record #:
8608
Author(s):
Abstract:
The John Frankie Singleton family of Pitt County is North Carolina's Farmers Home Administration Farm Family of the Year for 1976. The award is presented to the FHA farm family that demonstrates the most outstanding achievements in the state in farm methods, financial progress, family living, property investment, and resourcefulness in overcoming adversities. The family operates a swine operation in Pitt County. In 1966, the Singletons owned five hogs. By 1976, the operation had grown to about 125 sows averaging about 9.6 pigs per little. Quality is synonymous with the Singleton name, so much so that bids on the hogs are sometimes made without the buyers actually seeing the hogs they are bidding on.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 8, Aug 1977, p26, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
8613
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Abstract:
The largest wind turbine generator in the world stands atop Howard's Knob in Watauga County. Nearby residents have complained about the noise and television interference caused by the windmill. The purpose of the turbine is not to generate on-line electricity. The windmill is a research project to determine the feasibility of wind-generated electricity and to determine what problems may arise. Solutions to the noise and television interference problems are discussed in the article.
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Record #:
8615
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The North Carolina Jayvee Burn Center was dedicated November 23, 1980. The center occupies the fifth floor of the new Support Tower at North Carolina Memorial Hospital in Chapel Hill. The facility is one of only fourteen burn centers in the country. The expanded center was first proposed in 1971, when the then six-bed burn center was considered too limited in space and capabilities. The new center has twenty-three beds and state-of-the-art equipment.
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Record #:
8616
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Georgia Bonesteel of Hendersonville has been practicing and teaching lap quilting for the past ten years. Lap quilting is a method of making a quilt in small sections and assembling them for the finished product. Bonesteel has published a book titled LAP QUILTING and produced a twelve-show series on the topic for North Carolina television PBS stations.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 14 Issue 1, Jan 1982, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
8627
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Winston-Salem artist Bob Dance is nationally famous for his watercolors and acrylic paintings of wildlife and the outdoors, especially his scenes of the North Carolina coast. He is a graduate of the Philadelphia Museum College of Art. His works are included in many private and corporate collections and have been widely exhibited and featured in various art magazines and books.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 13 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p32-33, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
8805
Author(s):
Abstract:
Merrill Lynch, a North Carolina State University zoology graduate, is employed with the North Carolina Natural Heritage Program, a division of the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources. When he was hired in 1979, the program was seeking someone to survey bottomland hardwood forests along the Roanoke River. In his surveys, Lynch discovered an area now called the Camassia Slopes, where plants normally seen in the Smoky Mountains and Ohio River Valley grow. The land, which was later deeded to the Nature Conservancy, is one of twenty top priority sites along the Roanoke River identified for preservation.
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Record #:
8804
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Union Camp Corporation, a major forest products company, has deeded a 176-acre tract of woodlands along the Roanoke River in Northampton County to the Nature Conservancy. The area is known as Camassia Slopes. About 500 plants have been found there, representing 95 percent of the known plant families in North Carolina. Over two dozen rare and endangered wildflowers grow there, including James' sedge, eastern wahoo, and three-bird orchid.
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Record #:
8802
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The North Carolina Utilities Commission established the North Carolina Alternative Energy Corporation in 1980 to develop alternate energy resources. In part 1, executive director Dr. John Veigel examines the corporation's goals and aspirations. Before assuming this position, Veigel, who has a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from UCLA, served on the staff pf the Solar Energy Research Institute in Golden, Colorado.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
8803
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Utilities Commission established the North Carolina Alternative Energy Corporation in 1980 to develop alternate energy resources. In part two of this CAROLINA COUNTRY interview, executive director Dr. John Veigel continues his examination of the corporation's goals and aspirations.
Record #:
8800
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three geologists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill discuss their research on North Carolina's peat resources and other alternate fuels, including shale, methane gas, and sandstone brine. The professors are Roy L. Ingram, John M. Dennison, and Daniel A. Textoris.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p10-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8829
Author(s):
Abstract:
After a decade of debate and planning, the School of Veterinary Medicine at North Carolina State University in Raleigh began to take shape in 1979 on 182 acres. The school accepted its first class of 40 student in 1981, and two years later enrollment had grown to 152. This is the first in a series of articles about animal health and care, featuring interviews from faculty from the School of Veterinary Medicine.
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