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48 results for "Manual, John"
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Record #:
18889
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The state authorized charter schools in 1996 and since then 138 schools have been, at one point, operational. In 2007, 100 of these charter schools were functioning throughout the state. An assessment of these schools based on student learning, facilities, management, and financing demonstrates that charter schools often have lower scores in these areas when compared with public schools. Using information from the N.C. Center for Public Policy Research, the author makes suggestions for improving charter school performance and how to create a better educational environment for charter school students.
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21735
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Almost 300 years ago Colonel William Byrd II described the Great Dismal Swamp as \"a great and dreary swamp not fit for man or beast.\" Today the swamp's 126,000 acres straddle the border of Virginia/North Carolina. It is a National Wildlife Refuge on the Virginia side and a state park on the North Carolina side in 2007. The swamp has become a place of enjoyment and education. In 2013 over 80,000 visitors came to the state park.
Record #:
7871
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The headwaters of the Tuckasegee River begin in Panthertown Valley high in Jackson County. From there it rushes down through rugged Bonas Defeat Gorge. Here the rough currents and swirling gravel have cut holes through the rocks in the gorge through countless eons. Downstream the river slows making it ideal for canoeing and excellent for fishing. The river eventually empties into Fontana Lake. Once badly polluted, the Tuckasegee is fast becoming the rejuvenated centerpiece of the region.
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105
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The Pigeon River, a stretch of which has been called the most polluted in the country, is the subject of recent cleanup proposals. A proposed diversion of Cataloochee Creek could boost local economies with whitewater sports and better fishing.
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Record #:
426
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Some feel that various rivers in North Carolina should be designated natural and scenic rivers by the federal government.
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1067
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The crawfish is rapidly gaining popularity in North Carolina as a home-grown Cajun delicacy, as reflected by the annual Crawfish Boil at the North Carolina Farmers Market in Raleigh.
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Record #:
2893
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Water gardens, in addition to providing beauty, colors, and wildness in backyards, attract wildlife, like frogs, birds, rabbits, and insects.
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Record #:
3741
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The state-owned Green River Preserve, located in Henderson, Polk, and Rutherford counties, is 20,000 acres of diverse flora and fauna. It is also a managed game preserve providing hunters a place to hunt.
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Record #:
4780
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For many, canoeing or kayaking can be another way to view spectacular autumn vistas. Manuel describes four places to paddle and view: New River, Lake Jocassee, Merchant's Millpond, and Bear Island.
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4989
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The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the nation's most polluted national park as determined by measurements of visibility, ozone levels, and acid precipitation. Manuel discusses causes of the pollution and what steps are being taken to deal with the problem.
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Record #:
5848
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Hundreds of millponds, some dating to the 1700s, dot the state's Piedmont and Coastal Plain. No longer needed to power mills, these ponds provide areas for fishermen and vital habitats for wildlife. Manuel discusses the historical development of millponds and describes Bennett's Millpond in Chowan County and Tulls Millpond in Lenoir County.
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Record #:
6004
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Each year the number of tourists visiting the Outer Banks increases. Crowds flock to Hatteras, Nags Head, and Duck, and Corolla has become \"the mecca of the well-heeled tourist.\" However, beyond Corolla lies what is called the Corolla Outback, a place of Spanish mustangs, wild pigs, and sand dunes that swallow stands of trees, traversed only by a four-wheel drive vehicle. Manuel takes the reader on a tour of this Outer Banks spot few vacationers get to see.
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5941
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The Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center, located at Topsail Island, treats turtles with problems ranging from cracked shells to severed limbs and bacterial infections. Manuel describes the work of the center.
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Record #:
7881
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In 1996, the General Assembly created the N.C. Clean Water Management Trust Fund to deal with water pollution. The fund was the brainchild of State Senator Marc Basnight. The fund provides grants to groups for such projects as the restoration of degraded lands and building of riparian buffers. Not only has the fund protected water resources, it has facilitated significant increases in state game lands and other areas designated for outdoor recreation. One of the largest fund recipients has been the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, which has received almost $77 million for forty-nine projects statewide. The fund is helping the state reach its goal of preserving one million acres of additional open space (the One Million Acre Initiative) by the year 2009.
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Record #:
9699
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The water quality in many of the state's waterways has been marred by rapid growth, developments, timbering, and agricultural activities. Restoring streams to good health is a vital concern to the state and its citizens. In this first section of a three-part series, Manuel examines restoration projects in the state's mountain areas.
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