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80 results for "Dean, Jim"
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Record #:
25988
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Sunfish, rainbow trout, and brown trout, some of North Carolina’s most popular fishing species, are actually not native to the state. These species, among others, were brought to North Carolina and stocked in the 1800s.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Summer 1975, p26, 28
Record #:
26003
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There is evidence that there are people that are breaking game and fish laws in North Carolina, but some groups and individuals are taking a stand to stop these activities. There is a call for the nearly one million sportsmen in the state to be the added eyes and ears for wildlife enforcement officers.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Jan-Feb 1976, p32
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Record #:
26058
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Previously, sentiments have held that hunting deer require leaving the females along. However, biologists now realize that controlling deer herd populations in North Carolina require the shooting of does under certain conditions and restrictions.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 20 Issue 5, Nov-Dec 1976, p24
Record #:
26111
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Everyone agrees that fishing is fun, but many do not realize that it is also economically beneficial. According to the Sport Fishing Institute, there were over sixty-five million fresh and saltwater fishermen in 1975 who spent over $8 billion in expenditures. However, the added pressure to the resource is a growing concern to fishing as an recreational industry.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 21 Issue 4, 1977, p11
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Record #:
26112
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The wild turkey population in North Carolina has bounced back to between 5,000 and 6,000 turkeys. With an additional increase in suitable habitat, especially in the mountains, biologists believe the population could be in the tens of thousands.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 21 Issue 4, 1977, p23
Record #:
26320
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new program, Renewed Emphasis Now on an Environmental for Wildlife (RENEW), helps farmers prepare parts of their land for improving populations of small game animals.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 1978, p14
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Record #:
8912
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Abstract:
Dean continues his report about ongoing disagreements between Carolina Cape Fear Corporation, that plans to develop a large part of Bald Head Island that it owns, the state which owns the other part, and conservationists who fear that development of any kind would be difficult without harming the environment. Dean interviewed William R. Henderson, president of Carolina Cape Fear Corporation, consulted numerous reports and scientific studies about the island and marshes, and talked to prominent scientists and ecologists and visited Bald Head.
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Record #:
8888
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On June 7, 1971, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission voted to adopt a new Game Lands program. The new program involves the expansion of the game lands from around 700,000 acres to 1.5 million acres, changes in regulations, reductions in fees and other things that would affect hunters and fishermen. Dean discusses how the new program will work, the new regulations, and what it will mean for hunters, fishermen, and other outdoorsmen.
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Record #:
8886
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Dean discusses the ongoing disagreement between Carolina Cape Fear Corporation, that plans to develop a large part of Bald Head Island that it owns, the state which owns the other part, and conservationists who fear that development of any kind would be difficult without harming the environment.
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Record #:
8916
Author(s):
Abstract:
On June 7, 1971, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission voted to adopt a new Game Lands program. The new program involves the expansion of the game lands from around 700,000 acres to 1.5 million acres. When the question is raised about how fish and wildlife will be protected in the larger territory the answer is that it will be as good or better then it was when the game lands were smaller. Dean discusses how the new lands will be protected.
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Record #:
8923
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North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has changed its big game reporting system for the for the 1972-1973 hunting season. Previously a compulsory big game tagging system was in effect for all big game killed on the Wildlife Commission's Game Lands, but did not furnish information on big game killed off the game lands. Dean discusses how the new system, a statewide voluntary tagging program, will work.
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Record #:
9076
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In Part 1 of a new series, Dean discuss the state's mountain trout fishery.
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Record #:
9150
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In Part 2 of this series on trout fishing and trout habitat in North Carolina, Dean discusses effects on trout produced by human activity. It takes only one sand and gravel operation, one careless timber cut, one new development, or a new road to destroy a trout stream.
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Record #:
9497
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Dean looks back one hundred years, and with text and old photographs, reminds current hunters that tomorrow's “Good Old Days” begin today.
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Record #:
9500
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Dean describes two devastating floods that struck western North Carolina in mid-July 1916 and in August 1940.
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