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6 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 70 Issue 2, Feb 2006
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Record #:
7660
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In 2006, northern glaciers melt faster; sea levels rise; and warmer ocean waters expand. Global warming, driven by the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, is affecting life on the planet. Manuel reviews scientific information to project how these changes will affect plants, animals, and humans in North Carolina by the year 2100. In August 2005, North Carolina joined nearly forty other states in taking the initiative on global warming with the passage of the N.C. Global Warming Act. Among the act's requirements are the creation of a thirty-four member commission that will consider impacts on the state from rising temperatures and evaluate recommendations to reduce pollution.
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7652
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On the north shore of Fontana Lake lie 250,000 acres of Great Smoky Mountains National Park that are accessible only by boat. Few places in the park remain as remote, and the area is prized by fishermen, environmentalists, and others who appreciate its solitude. When the dam was completed in 1944, Swain County residents were promised a road to the homesteads made inaccessible by the dam. A seven-mile portion was built between 1948 and 1972, then construction stopped. A two-year environmental impact statement which will be finished in 2006 by the National Park Service will decide the fate of the area and the road. Igelman gives reasons for the region's popularity and the options available to the park to satisfy the 1943 agreement.
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Record #:
7659
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North Carolina's wild pig population is increasing and expanding. The state's history of wild pigs began in 1912 with the introduction of European pigs into Graham County for hunting purposes. Many of them escaped from the holding areas and into the mountains. Later they reached the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. As the pigs are a threat to native wildlife and habitat both inside and outside the park, the National Park Service began a removal program in 1977. To date, nearly 10,000 pigs have been shot or removed, but park officials admit the problem is still there. The danger of the wild pigs' expansion to the counties of eastern North Carolina is that they could bring disease which could devastate the pork industry.
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Record #:
7622
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Quail Forever was founded in the summer of 2005 by Pheasants Forever, a conservation group with over twenty years experience in maintaining and restoring pheasant habitats. The first chapter of Quail Forever in North Carolina was formed by sportsmen in the southern Coastal Plain. The chapter will focus its efforts on improving quail habitats in the area's public lands.
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Record #:
7654
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Brown bullhead, white catfish, white perch, yellow perch, chain pickerel, and common carp are among species often scorned, ignored, and under-fished by freshwater fishermen. Fishermen who do seek them out can find an exciting day of fishing and a tasty meal. Kibler describes the fish, where to find them, and whether they are good to eat.
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7653
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The best deer hunt begins with a careful check of the lay of the land months before the season opens. Knowing the habit and topography that attract deer will benefit the hunter. Almy provides some land features to scout for, including funnels, escape cover, old homesites, fruit trees, and water sources.\r\n\r\n
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