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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 69 Issue 8, Aug 2005
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Record #:
7360
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Over three thousand species of mosquitoes inhabit the earth. North Carolina's mild, humid climate and abundant wetlands provide fertile breeding grounds for these insects. Around sixty species inhabit the state, but only forty of them bite humans and animals, and of that number, twelve can cause serious problems. Some of the most troublesome ones have been introduced into the state from other parts of the world.
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Record #:
7358
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The high winds and flooding of the Great Storm of 1899 drove residents of Shackleford Banks and Ca'e (Cape) Banks from their homes forever. Survivors migrated to Morehead City, Harkers Island, Marshallberg, and Salter Path where they built new homes and continued their community traditions. The original settlers arrived in the 1700s and by the mid-1800s, the population of the banks had reached around eight hundred. Life revolved around whaling and fishing. In 1999, six hundred descendants of the settlers gathered on the banks to mark the one hundredth anniversary of the storm.
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Record #:
7357
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Lynch discusses the Scuppernong River. The headwaters originate in Lake Phelps. The river slowly flows through undeveloped swamp forest and agricultural land in Washington and Tyrrell Counties for twenty-six miles before emptying into the Albemarle Sound near Columbia. Lying in an isolated section of the state, the river has escaped pollution problems that plague other rivers. No houses or industries line its banks. Conservation agencies protect much of the floodplain.
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Record #:
7353
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North Carolina generally has the largest wintering East Coast population of tundra swans. Only five states have hunting seasons for the eastern population, and North Carolina usually has the largest harvest. The first tundra swan hunting season in the state took place in 1984-1985 and 867 birds were killed. The 2004-2005 season produced the second-lowest harvest on record with 1,745 birds taken. Wilson discusses this decline in the harvest.
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Record #:
7361
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Correll describes an unusual fish, a skate, found in the state's coastal waters. It has a skeleton like a shark, flaps its wing-like fins like a bird to help it glide through the water, and is so flat that it is often described as a pancake. The name derives from an old Norse word which meant long, narrow, and pointed.
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