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12 results for Lynch, Ida Phillips
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Record #:
3776
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The Jocassee Gorges along the North and South Carolina border is a great wilderness area. Duke Energy plans to sell 50,000 acres there and has offered the state first opportunity to purchase, provided a 1999 deadline can be met.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 46 Issue 2, Spring 1998, p8-9,15, il
Record #:
4597
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In the remote mountains of Western Carolina, a combination of high local rainfall, steep river and stream gradients, and erosion have carved the Jocassee Gorges. The greatest waterfall concentration in eastern North America is found there. Biologists have been coming to explore the rare plant life since French botanist Andre Michaux visited the area in 1788. Although not as fully explored as the plants, a variety of animals inhabits the area, including sixteen species of salamanders.
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Record #:
5221
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Bird watching is a popular leisure time activity, with over 50 million Americans identifying themselves as bird watchers in a 1996 survey. Lynch provides information on getting started, finding beginning birding trips, what field guide to purchase, and types of binoculars to use.
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Record #:
5206
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The Wildlife and Industry (WAIT) program, run by the North Carolina Wildlife Federation Endowment and Education Fund, brings together state and local conservation groups and industry to accomplish two goals: creating wildlife habitats on commercial and industrial lands and educating people about wildlife occupying the habitats. Lynch discusses WAIT programs at Kenet Electronics in Shelby, Duke Energy's Buck Steam Station, and IBM in Research Triangle Park.
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Record #:
5368
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The Nature Conservancy is marking twenty-five years of preserving a variety of natural areas across the state. Nationally, the group has a million members, with 26,000 in North Carolina. The state group has also protected 538,459 acres. Lynch discusses the group's accomplishments over the past twenty-five years and its plans for the future.
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Record #:
5847
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Bird Island is North Carolina's southernmost island and one of the few remaining undeveloped barrier islands. In the early 1990s, island owners planned to develop it commercially. Lynch discusses the ten-year struggle to save the island, its attraction, and why it stirs such strong loyalty in people.
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Record #:
5805
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North Carolina operates three aquariums along the coast at Roanoke Island near Manteo, at Pine Knoll Shores near Atlantic Beach, and at Fort Fisher near Wilmington. Phillips discusses the attractions at each.
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Record #:
7160
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Located ten miles south of Pittsboro in Chatham County, the 275-acre White Pines Preserve, a Triangle Land Conservancy property, is known for its isolated stand of white pines. The property is located on a promontory bounded by the confluence of the Rocky and Deep rivers. Lynch describes the area, which, for 10,000 years, has been a refuge for a collection of mountain, Piedmont, and coastal plains flora and fauna.
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Record #:
7357
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Lynch discusses the Scuppernong River. The headwaters originate in Lake Phelps. The river slowly flows through undeveloped swamp forest and agricultural land in Washington and Tyrrell Counties for twenty-six miles before emptying into the Albemarle Sound near Columbia. Lying in an isolated section of the state, the river has escaped pollution problems that plague other rivers. No houses or industries line its banks. Conservation agencies protect much of the floodplain.
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Record #:
8343
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The North Carolina Natural Heritage Program strives to inventory and protect plants, animals, and habitats at significant natural areas, such as Rumbling Bald Mountain. The program has operated for thirty years. Lynch discusses the expert field work done by biologists and botanists that helps agencies and private groups decide on funding needed to preserve ecologically valuable places.
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Record #:
10056
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Mike and Ali Lubbock founded the Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park and Eco-Center in Scotland Neck in Halifax County in 1989. Covering about nine acres, the center boasts the largest collection of waterfowl in the world and is a conservation and research orientated center for birds, especially rare and endangered waterfowl. The center contains about 1,000 birds representing over 170 species from six continents.
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Record #:
2953
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The North Carolina Wildlife Federation's list of the five most endangered state habitats includes the spruce fir forests in the Great Smoky and Black mountains and the Pamlico and Albemarle sound estuaries.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 44 Issue 3, Summer 1996, p2-6, il