NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 43 Issue 4, Apr 1979
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
9550
Author(s):
Abstract:
Englishman George Roe is fascinated by hawks. He has painted four of our most common species in all their grace and awesome power-the red shouldered hawk, sharp-shinned hawk, Cooper's hawk, and red-tailed hawk. He received his artistic training at a number of schools in England, including the Cambridge School of Art. For twelve years after graduation he taught school and painted portraits. He became so successful that in 1970, he gave up teaching to become a full-time artist and to pursue his first love, painting wildlife.
Full Text:
Record #:
9549
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are more different species of salamanders living in western North Carolina than anywhere else in the world. Among them are the long-tailed, red-cheeked, two-lined, Blue Ridge spring, and red-backed salamander.
Full Text:
Record #:
9551
Author(s):
Abstract:
Taylor discusses the career of Gilbert Pearson, one of North Carolina's and the nation's most effective wildlife conservationists. He was the first man to achieve significant success in developing an effective program of wildlife protection for the state. He was also a leader in the fight to ban market and plume hunting which feathers widely used in women's hats.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
9552
Author(s):
Abstract:
Taylor reports on the state's ongoing deer restoration project. The first serious attempts at restoration took place in the 1890s on the Biltmore Estate near Asheville. By the 1930s there were only a few thousand left in North Carolina. However, current work by the North Carolina Wildlife resources Commission has brought the statewide population back to between 400,000 and 500,000.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9553
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a recent survey by the Tennessee Valley Authority, titled “Where the Water Isn't Clean Anymore,” three North Carolina Rivers have been named as problem areas--the Pigeon River, North Toe, and Nolichucky.
Full Text: