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9 results for The State Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983
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Record #:
8196
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In 1863, a mob of Confederate soldiers' wives and mothers, fed up with the inflation from the ongoing Civil War, marched through Salisbury with axes and hatchets demanding the scarce foodstuffs that various speculators were stockpiling to sell out of state at high prices. Through intimidation and force the women collected twenty-three barrels of flour, two sacks of salt, a barrel of molasses, and twenty dollars in Confederate money. After the women appealed to Governor Zebulon Vance, he permanently banned the export of foodstuffs and cloth out of the state.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p13,14, il, por
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Record #:
8211
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Wildacres Retreat is a fourteen-hundred-acre forestland sitting atop Pompey's Knob beside the Blue Ridge Parkway. I. D. (Dick) Blumenthal of Charlotte bought the land in 1936 for only $6,500. The original owner, Thomas Dixon, famous for his racist novel “The Clansmen,” wanted the site to be a colony of artists and scientists. When Blumenthal acquired the property, he began inviting interfaith religious groups to Wildacres Lodge in an effort to quash the property's racist beginnings. He invited different groups and societies each week and established camps for musicians and artists to come and appreciate the solitude and beauty of the area. Wildacres hosts over three thousand participants a year. Blumenthal died in 1978 and is buried alongside his wife at the summit of the mountain.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p16-18, por
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Record #:
8458
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The plank road between New Bern and Hillsborough, often called Cornwallis' Road, was built by Governor William Tryon in 1771. Tryon sent a force of 4,000 men to quell a rebellion of Regulators who were gathered around Hillsborough. Along the way, Tryon realized that a road was needed to move his forces quickly, as rebellious hostilities were growing in western North Carolina. During the Revolutionary War, General Charles Cornwallis used the road to transport supplies and to forage the countryside. Paul Koepke moved to Durham County during the 1960s. His residence at Two-Moon Pond is located along what was the old plank road. In 1960 the road was maintained by Durham County as a rural dirt road. During the 1970s however, the road was updated and paved. Since then residential buildings and businesses have moved into the area, bringing with them roadside trash and crime.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p11-12, por
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Record #:
8457
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The United States military participates in a yearly joint exercise called Solid Shield. This exercise began in 1963 and occurs along the North Carolina coast and includes Camp Lejeune and Fort Bragg. The operation in 1983 included every branch of the American military and over 47,000 soldiers. The exercise has evolved over the years and currently is based on the scenario that a friendly nation is being subjected to outside intervention from a third country resulting in governmental instability. The military's objective is to offer military assistance and restore order for the friendly government. The author observes Solid Shield from the deck the U.S.S. Inchon, a naval amphibious assault ship that carries twenty-eight helicopters and 2,000 Marines.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p8-10, por
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Record #:
8461
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Sam Phillips built a two-room law office on Franklin Street across from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the 1840s. Since then the property has changed owners only a few times. Phillips served as a law professor at the university, as an auditor for Governor Zebulon Vance's Confederate cabinet, and as solicitor general under President Ulysses S. Grant. In 1895 the property was sold to Mr. and Mrs. Adam A. Kluttz. They rented the office to single professors and used it as a guest house during the summer months. The property was then given to the Kluttz's nephew Walter Creech, a student at the university. Following Creech's death, the property was sold with guidance coming from the Chapel Hill Preservation Society. Former UNC students Phillip and Stephanie Ben bought the property to convert it into their home. They are planning to renovate the home as well as add several additional rooms. All modifications to the home are subject to the Preservation Society's and the U.S. Department of Interior's approval.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p21-22, por
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Record #:
8460
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Buzzard Town, located about twenty miles north of Rocky Mount, was a small town that received little publicity. During the Great Depression the Resettlement Administration placed a number of farmers around Buzzard Town. When many of these farmers failed, they went to work in the local mills. Buzzard Town became famous for a baseball game played between the hometown Bears and the Enfield Eagles. The Bears had not beaten the Eagles that season and were losing again 15-1 in the last game. A Bears hitter, however, finally drove a homerun. The ball bounced and landed in the car of a passing train. According to the rules at that time, the Bears hitter could continuously circle the bases till the ball was put back into play. An Eagles team member jumped on a horse and recovered the ball in Rocky Mount. By the time he returned, the Eagles were losing 120-15. The Eagles decided to forfeit the game, so the Buzzard Town Bears won the game.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p19-20, il
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Record #:
8459
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Garland Stout, a retired engineer, began making maps after researching his wife's Randolph County ancestors. Since then, Stout has drawn over 3,000 maps that include drawings of all 100 North Carolina counties. Stout's maps include old family residences, old churches, deserted towns with the dates they were incorporated, and abandoned roads. Stout is also a highly respected genealogist and is considered an expert in North Carolina post office history. Stout is currently trying to locate, by present county boundaries, the locations of original North Carolina land patents and land grants. He has completed sixty percent of the project to date.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p15, por
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Record #:
8463
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Since 1976, the Town of Halifax has performed the play \"First for Freedom.\" The summer production includes both fact and fiction in telling the story of Halifax's role during the Revolutionary War. The Halifax Resolves, signed a few months before the United States Declaration of Independence, was the first official declaration of independence from Great Britain. The play, written by Maxville Burt Williams, includes scenes from historic Halifax as well as scenes from the Fourth Provincial Congress that met at the Halifax courthouse on April 12, 1776.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p27-28, por
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Record #:
8462
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Storytellers sit around Dawse Cook's blacksmith shop in Millerville, recounting tall tells about summer's most hated insect, the mosquito. The stories include tales about how many mosquitoes a bird eats in a day, a chicken-eating mosquito, a mosquito that unscrewed its short bill and replaced it with a long one, and mosquitoes that get drunk from sucking on men drinking moonshine.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p22-23, il
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