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8 results for Baseball--History
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Record #:
5866
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On August 30, 1916, Winston-Salem and Asheville, two baseball teams in the North Carolina State League, made baseball history by playing the shortest 9-inning game on record - 31 minutes. Thomas Wolfe was the batboy for the Asheville team. The feat lay hidden for fifty years until it was accidentally discovered by Dick Kaplan, a sports writer for the Asheville Citizen.
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Record #:
7260
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The North Carolina Baseball Museum, located at Fleming Stadium in Wilson, opened February 2, 2004. The collection is devoted solely to the state's baseball history, which dates back to the 19th-century.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p102-104, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8460
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Buzzard Town, located about twenty miles north of Rocky Mount, was a small town that received little publicity. During the Great Depression the Resettlement Administration placed a number of farmers around Buzzard Town. When many of these farmers failed, they went to work in the local mills. Buzzard Town became famous for a baseball game played between the hometown Bears and the Enfield Eagles. The Bears had not beaten the Eagles that season and were losing again 15-1 in the last game. A Bears hitter, however, finally drove a homerun. The ball bounced and landed in the car of a passing train. According to the rules at that time, the Bears hitter could continuously circle the bases till the ball was put back into play. An Eagles team member jumped on a horse and recovered the ball in Rocky Mount. By the time he returned, the Eagles were losing 120-15. The Eagles decided to forfeit the game, so the Buzzard Town Bears won the game.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p19-20, il
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Record #:
22175
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The American Civil War was a brutal, bloody event in our history, but there is a period when most of the fighting ceases--the four-month winter period of bad weather and terrible roads. Soldiers on both sides do many activities to pass the time. One activity that helps soldiers on both sides, even those held in prisons, escape the horrors of war throughout the year is baseball. Gerard explains baseball's popularity and how Salisbury Prison in Western NC became a center for its playing.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p182-188, 190, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24466
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After a 40-year hiatus, minor league baseball teams are making a major comeback; Cities such as Charlotte, Greensboro, Durham, Winston-Salem, and Asheville all have teams and good attendance at games. This article recounts the history of minor league baseball in North Carolina and why it made a comeback.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 2, July 1991, p16-19, il
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Record #:
28142
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Hall of Fame baseball player Joe Morgan is interviewed about time playing for the Durham Bulls. Morgan describes life in Durham in 1963, the team’s coaches, and his thoughts on the film Bull Durham. Morgan also discusses how race played a role as a member of a baseball team in the 1960s. Morgan discusses segregation in Durham and compares being an African-American baseball player playing in Durham to one playing in San Antonio.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 31, July 2008, p19 Periodical Website
Record #:
28143
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A former statistician for the Durham Bulls describes baseball and the Durham Bulls in the 1980s. The team and rough atmosphere created by fans in 1980s are compared with the current team and family-friendly atmosphere. The author also describes the best game he ever attended and famous baseball players who he watched play.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 27, July 2008, p15-17 Periodical Website
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28566
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The Independent Carolina League was the “Outlaw” professional baseball association that briefly operated in the mill towns around Charlotte from 1936 to 1938. The league was known for its passion, controversy, and resistance to northern baseball organization.
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