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7 results for The Researcher Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002
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Record #:
34675
Author(s):
Abstract:
Drawing on oral histories passed down through his family, this author presents an alternative history of North Carolinian privateer Otway Burns. The author’s grandfather recalled that Beaufort residents were terrified of Burns during the early 19th century. Following the disappearance of Theodosia Burr’s schooner off the North Carolina coast in 1812, the crew of SNAP DRAGON, Otway Burn’s vessel, came to Beaufort wearing clothes supposedly taken from Burr. Residents believed SNAP DRAGON had attacked Burr’s vessel in an act of piracy. The author reports residents remained wary of Burns and, following his death, chose to bury Burns outside of town.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p11-14, il, por
Record #:
34676
Author(s):
Abstract:
Appleton Oaksmith, a Confederate veteran, purchased land on Bogue Banks in the 1870s in hope of creating a beachside resort. The land had been deeded out to the heirs of former residents and, concerned with future lawsuits, Oaksmith used his wife’s and wife’s sister’s names to purchase the properties. In total, Oaksmith acquired 300 acres of Atlantic Beach for a summer resort.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p15-18, il, por
Record #:
34678
Abstract:
The U Drop Inn was built as a rooming house in Morehead City during the 1920s. Featuring 15 rooms and 30 beds, the inn was run by Lillian English Robinson from the 1940s through 1963. Single rooms cost $2.00 while a double room could be rented for $5.00 per night. A frequent lodging house during World War II, the inn was frequented by many return guests. A local restaurant purchased the property in the 1960s, and the building was bulldozed in 1967.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p21-22, il
Record #:
34673
Author(s):
Abstract:
Frank Salisbury was editor of the Morehead City newspaper between 1924 and 1964. A photographer and founder of the Carteret County Historical Society, Salisbury was interested in preserving and documenting Carteret County’s heritage, both historic and modern. He made an effort to record many historic structures in town, and was a well published author on the history of Morehead City.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p3-5, il, por
Record #:
34674
Abstract:
Frank Salisbury was editor of the Morehead City newspaper between 1924 and 1964. A photographer and founder of the Carteret County Historical Society, Salisbury was interested in preserving and documenting Carteret County’s heritage, both historic and modern. He made an effort to record many historic structures in town, and was a well published author on the history of Morehead City.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p6-10, il
Record #:
34677
Author(s):
Abstract:
Parent-Teacher Associations (PTAs) throughout Carteret County raised close to $3,000 for Country school improvements in 1927. The funds, which came from fundraisers and membership fees, were used to buy library books, maps, pianos, and Victrolas for school use. Other allocations include building repairs and school supplies.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p19, il
Record #:
34672
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the Colonial period, sheep were popular livestock raised throughout Carteret County. The wool was used for home spun clothing while lamb and mutton were staples in the local diet. Sheep were so prevalent that Portsmouth Island was also known as “Sheep Island.”
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p5, map