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8 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 54 Issue 1, Fall 2014
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Record #:
22763
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Abstract:
Many North Carolina towns have monuments and war memorials commemorating those who fought and died in major military conflicts. Public historian, Martha Norkunas, describes the reasons for constructing such monuments, what they represent, and how who creates the memorial and when can influence the depiction of certain events.
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Record #:
22770
Abstract:
Commemorative monuments are often planned and designed to represent a particular time and place, however, North Carolina lighthouses and the Tar Baby vs. St. Sebastian sculpture unintentionally became monuments of immense importance. The lighthouses were built for practical use to help sailors navigate the difficult North Carolina coastline, but now they are icons of state tourism. Michael Richards' sculpture, Tar Baby vs. St. Sebastian commemorates the Tuskegee Airmen, but after Richards' death during the September 11, 2001 attacks, this sculpture memorializes Richards and those who also lost their lives on 9/11.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 54 Issue 1, Fall 2014, p36-37, il
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Record #:
22768
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Kituwah, located in the Tuckaseegee River valley in western North Carolina, is a sacred place of great religious importance to Cherokee Indians. In the early 1820s, the Cherokees lost Kituwah to the United States government, but in 1996, they had the opportunity to reacquire the town. Today, the site celebrates traditional and current Cherokee culture as well as the town's history.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 54 Issue 1, Fall 2014, p28-29, il
Record #:
22766
Abstract:
Scotch-Irish immigrants brought unique traditions to the Piedmont of North Carolina. Former folklore and American literature professor, Daniel Patterson, examines gravestones from the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries as a lens for identifying these customs, while providing a brief history of gravestone carving in the Piedmont.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 54 Issue 1, Fall 2014, p14-15, il
Record #:
22764
Author(s):
Abstract:
Art and architecture historian, Kirk Savage, provides a brief history of monument construction in the United States, highlighting the boost in memorials following the Civil War and the lack of monuments for African Americans and women. To emphasize contemporary trends in public memorials, he then describes three recently erected monuments in North Carolina: the 9/11 World Trade Center Beam, Chapel Hill's monument to the \"Unsung Founders,\" and the Andy Griffith monuments.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 54 Issue 1, Fall 2014, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
22769
Author(s):
Abstract:
In addition to statues and stone monuments, hand-made quilts can commemorate specific events and people, or serve as memorials to honor the dead. North Carolina women have made quilts throughout history to memorialize particular individuals or events, including the 1976 \"Historical Landmarks of Wake County\" quilt, which was created to celebrate the National Bicentennial.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 54 Issue 1, Fall 2014, p32-33, il
Record #:
22765
Abstract:
North Carolina has rich African American history, but only after the Civil Rights Movement did local and state monuments begin to publicly commemorate this history. Architectural historian, Catherine Bishir, identifies many important African American monuments in the state and explains that the time-period during which they were constructed can tell us much about the state's past.
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Record #:
22767
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mourning the death of a loved one during the nineteenth century involved a series of customs unfamiliar to modern society. This article includes a brief description about the history of mourning in America during the Victorian Era, the differences between male and female mourning, and the specifics of some of these traditions.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 54 Issue 1, Fall 2014, p18-19, il, por
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