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11 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005
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Record #:
7688
Author(s):
Abstract:
Education for the state's Native Americans has come a long way since the Coharie Indians in Sampson County began a subscription school in 1859. Native Americans started schools in other counties, including the High Plains Indian School in Person County. Schools developed in the era of segregation, and it was not until 1954 that the era began to end. Programs to develop Native American teachers began in the 1920s at Pembroke State University. The state opened the East Carolina Indian School in 1942 in Sampson and Harnett Counties to help Native Americans gain a full high school education.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p10-12, il
Record #:
7687
Author(s):
Abstract:
About 22,000 people speak the Cherokee language today. The language is part of the Iroquoian language family, and the Cherokee represent the only group of Southern Iroquoian speakers. Through the efforts of a Cherokee named Sequoyah, tribal members began to read and write in their own language. Relocation of a large part of the Cherokees to Oklahoma and educational prohibitions against speaking their native language caused the language to almost die out. In recent years the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in North Carolina have taken steps to reclaim their language.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p7-9, il, por
Record #:
7690
Author(s):
Abstract:
The contemporary powwow is a gathering of Native Americans, but unlike those of earlier days, it knows no tribal boundaries. Songs and dances once sung or danced only by a specific tribe are now performed by Native Americans from other parts of the country. The contemporary powwow provides an opportunity for people to celebrate their Native American heritage and culture. Richardson describes powwows in North Carolina.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p33-35, il
Record #:
7691
Author(s):
Abstract:
English settlers arrived in North Carolina in the 1500s. Native Americans arrived 10,000 years before. They left no written accounts, so what is known of their activities is derived through investigations by archaeologists. Native American prehistory in the state is divided into four time periods: Paleo-Indian, Archaic, Woodland, and Contact. This article examines what is known of the Paleo-Indian Period.
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Record #:
7667
Author(s):
Abstract:
Native Americans have lived on what is now North Carolina around 12,000 years. The land was much different then--drier, cooler weather and different trees and plants. Porter discusses early contact with European explorers, including de Soto and Pardo. Nearly three dozen tribes have inhabited the state through the years. Today, North Carolina officially recognizes eight tribes.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p1-2, il, por, map
Record #:
7689
Abstract:
After the Civil War, laws passed by the North Carolina General Assembly to retain the power of the white community divided the races between \"white\" and \"colored.\" For the state's Native American population, this posed a problem. They could not attend white churches, and they feared attending black churches would cause them to lose their identity as Indians. Their solution was to build their own churches. In the eastern part of the state, missionaries and preachers had converted many Indians to Christianity by the late 1800s. Most of the churches built were either Baptist or Methodist. By the 2000, most of the state's 100,000 Indians follow these two denominations.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p14-15, il
Record #:
7679
Author(s):
Abstract:
La Vere recounts services rendered by the state's Native American population during World War II. On the Qualla Boundary reservation, every eligible young Cherokee man registered for the draft, and 321 eventually served in the military. Smaller tribes, like the Lumbees, also sent large numbers to the war. A number were killed or wounded, and medals including the Purple Heart, Distinguished Flying Cross, and Silver Star, were awarded. Native American women also served as nurses at home and near the war front, and one served as a WASP, Women Airforce Service Pilots.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p28-29, il, por
Record #:
7680
Author(s):
Abstract:
Priscilla Freeman Jacobs led the Waccamaw-Siouan, a state recognized American Indian tribe, from 1986 to 2005. She is the first woman to hold the position of chief in her tribe in the 20th-century and is the first tribal woman to become a minister. Lerch discusses Jacobs' role as tribal chief. Deciding not to seek reelection as chief in 2005, Jacobs now serves as pastor of the Life Changing Community Church in Riegelwood.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p30-31, il, por
Record #:
7678
Author(s):
Abstract:
Joel Queen is an eighth-generation potter. Queen, a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee, has always been interested in arts and crafts, but has worked as an artist full-time only for the past four years. In 2005, he opened his own gallery near Cherokee to show and sell his work. Queen's creations have been displayed at the Smithsonian Institution, the British Museum in London, and at Monticello.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p25-27, il, por
Record #:
7677
Abstract:
North Carolina has the largest American Indian population east of the Mississippi River. The 2000 U.S. Census counts 99,551 individuals who listed as American Indians. The state recognizes eight tribes: Eastern Band of the Cherokee; Coharie; Lumbee; Haliwa-Saponi; Sappony; Meherrin; Occaneechi Band of Saponi Nation; and Waccamaw-Siouan. The federal government officially recognizes one tribe--the Cherokee.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p22-24, il
Record #:
7676
Abstract:
In 1971, the North Carolina Commission of Indian Affairs was created. The purpose of the commission is to advocate for Indian communities, tribes, and organizations, and to bring together local, state, and federal money and other resources that can help.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p20-22, il, map