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5 results for Sequoyah, ca. 1767-1843
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Record #:
8845
Author(s):
Abstract:
Born in 1760, George Gist preferred his Cherokee name, Sequoyah. Borrowing English letters, Sequoyah created an eighty-six sound syllabary of the Cherokee language. He presented his syllabary to the Cherokee council in 1819, and the council moved to establish schools. After a time, Sequoyah moved west and migrated to Mexico, after which his whereabouts were not known.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 7, Dec 1980, p21-22, il
Full Text:
Record #:
11290
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sharpe recounts how Sequoyah created an alphabet over one hundred years ago and brought literacy to the Cherokees.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 10, Oct 1965, p11, 28, il
Full Text:
Record #:
13074
Abstract:
North Carolina native, George Guess (Gist), popularly known as Sequoyah, is famous for inventing the Cherokee alphabet. Carrying the written language to Mexico during the mid-1800s, Sequoyah taught fellow Cherokees using one language set. Compiled through years of study and a compiling a syllabary of 85 characters, Sequoyah disseminated Cherokee knowledge Cherokee in schools and newspapers in the Oklahoma Territory.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 20, Feb 1957, p13-14, il
Full Text:
Record #:
15188
Abstract:
Sequoyah, son of a peddler called Gist and an unknown Native American woman, invented the Cherokee alphabet. He lived and traveled in western North Carolina, Tennessee, and Georgia until Andrew Jackson's \"Heart-Break Removal\" in the 1830s. He died in 1843 from a fever on the move west.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 19, Oct 1938, p9, 20
Full Text:
Record #:
7687
Author(s):
Abstract:
About 22,000 people speak the Cherokee language today. The language is part of the Iroquoian language family, and the Cherokee represent the only group of Southern Iroquoian speakers. Through the efforts of a Cherokee named Sequoyah, tribal members began to read and write in their own language. Relocation of a large part of the Cherokees to Oklahoma and educational prohibitions against speaking their native language caused the language to almost die out. In recent years the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in North Carolina have taken steps to reclaim their language.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p7-9, il, por