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16 results for Sea Chest Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976
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Record #:
29861
Author(s):
Abstract:
Maurice L. Burrus, born in Hatters is 1898, first played baseball while attending Elizabeth City High School. He later moved on to Oak Ridge Preparatory, Furman University, and then North Carolina State, where he played baseball while working on textile engineering. In 1919, when Burrus left college he built up a reputation as a professional batter and was later brought up to the National League Club in Philadelphia. With improved fielding, Burrus was the Boston Brave's regular first baseman by 1925. Although he only played 10 years of professional baseball, Burrus was Dare County's first major league baseball player.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p17-19, por
Record #:
29862
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rasmus S. Midgett, born in 1851, was awarded a gold medal of honor for lifesaving in 1899 when he single-handedly rescued 10 men from the wreck of the PRISCILLA. While on patrol from Gull Shoal Life Saving Station, Midgett pulled each man off the ship one by one, and brought them to the beach until all were rescued.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p20-23, por
Record #:
29859
Author(s):
Abstract:
Benjamin B. Dailey, keeper of the Cape Hatteras Station, received Gold Lifesaving Medals issued in the first thirty years of the Life Saving Service in North Carolina. This medal of honor was the highest award available for lifesaving from the United States government. One such award was received for the rescue of the EPHRAIM WILLIAMS that encountered stormy weather in 1889.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p4-7, il, por
Record #:
29860
Abstract:
Unaka Benjamin Jennette, born in 1882, served thirty-eight years in the Lighthouse Service. From 1919 to 1937, Jennette was keeper of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, before the lighthouse was put in the hands of United States Coast Guard. Jennette was responsible for the care and management of the light and station, especially during severe storms and hurricanes.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p8-16, por
Record #:
29863
Abstract:
After Hatteras schools were consolidated and the village came together to buy the old school building, Mrs. Lillie Peele helped an idea become a reality: a village library. With the help of the Hatteras Village Library Committee, Dare County Library Committee, and the Dare County Board of Commissioners, the library was commissioned in 1957 and served the community until 1976. A new library was then dedicated as the Lillie Oden Peele Library.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p24-31, por
Record #:
29865
Author(s):
Abstract:
The German steamship BREWSTER, bound for New York from Jamaica in 1909, landed in the middle of the Diamond Shoals. One of the largest ships to run aground with a crew of 33 men, BREWSTER was discovered by three lifesaving crews out of Cape Hatteras and Creeds Hill. The entire crew was saved and 11 men were awarded medals of honor for their part in the rescue.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p39, por
Record #:
29864
Abstract:
Born in 1883, Mrs. Jenette Stowe has cared for people all her life. Now at the age of 93, Stowe has delivered over 300 babies as a midwife on the Outer Banks, from Ocracoke to Chicamacomico.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p32-38, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29866
Abstract:
Born in Avon, North Carolina in 1871, Baxter Benjamin Miller entered the Life Saving Service in 1890 and retired after 30 years of service in 1921. Credited with saving over 300 lives during his career, Miller was awarded two Congressional Medals of Honor for Lifesaving, a Gold Medal from the US Government and silver watch from the German Government for rescue of the steampship BREWSTER, and a medal for the resuscitation of a man in 1911. Miller was also involved, on his last day of service in 1921, with the boarding party on the ghost ship, CARROLL A. DEERING.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p40-45, por
Record #:
29867
Abstract:
Urias O'Neal Gaskins (1878-1919) was the officer in charge of the Cape Hatteras Coast Guard Station and received a medal for his gallant efforts in the rescue of the steamship BREWSTER. Isaac L. Jennette (1857-1913) also spent his life in the service of the Coast Guard and earned a silver medal of honor for lifesaving assistance to the crew of BREWSTER. Edward J. Midgette, originally from Avon, North Carolina, also served 28 years in the lifesaving service.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p46-51, por
Record #:
29874
Abstract:
John Allen Midgett, educated in Rodanthe and Elizabeth City, North Carolina, joined the Life Saving Service as a surfman at Little Kinnakeet. He then moved onto Warrant Officer and then First Class Officer at Gull Shoal and then Chicamacomico Station. While at Chicamacomico, the ship MIRLO came to shore in 1918 under torpedo attack. Under Captain Johnny, boats attempted to rescue the crew, 44 taken back in Midgett's boat. Midgett received the Congressional and the English Medal, the cup and the American Cross of Honor for the MIRLO's rescue.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p62-71, por
Record #:
29883
Author(s):
Abstract:
Accounts of shipwrecks and rescues along the Outer Banks are often dramatic, and the rescue of the ANNA May is no exception. The fishing trawler went aground on Diamond Shoals in 1931. As the vessel sank, the crew of 5 were stranded clinging just above the breakers. Surviving over night, the crew were reached by Cape Hatteras Coast Guard lifeboats the following morning just as the mast broke into the waters.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p86-87, por
Record #:
29879
Author(s):
Abstract:
Richard Dailey (1889-1966), spent 35 years in the service of the Weather Bureau Service, and helped make Hatteras Island an important place for the understanding and development of weather forecasting.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p78-85, por
Record #:
35990
Abstract:
The former Maude Miller had an eventful career history. She was first a schoolteacher at what was called a "pay school" by Hatteras Island residents. She became the county welfare supervisor during the 1930s, gaining experience with the Depression’s effects on the Island. As a postmistress, she was second generation employee (her father served during the 1800s). During World War II, she was a Coastal Observer, with the Navy issuing a service certificate. Of her late husband, Estus Preston White, she noted their common work background in education, with his work on the Board. His local administrative roles included chairman of Methodist Sunday School and electric plant, as well as county administrative work as a commissioner.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p52-59
Record #:
35991
Author(s):
Abstract:
His life didn’t include authorship until he was eighty-three. As if to make up for lost writing time, he has published The Kinnakeeter, and while still engaged in Sunday School teaching, he has started his second book, Isle of Paradise (about Hatteras Island). The careers that occupied his life before writing were teacher, fisherman, wholesale merchant, and co-owner of a seaweed business (he and his father were the first to bring this type of business to Hatteras Island).
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p60-61
Record #:
35992
Abstract:
A true down homer was about more than just being born in a local town or having one’s name affiliated with a local building. What made Charlie Gray Sr. so included turning down job offers after graduation from North Carolina State College, so he could own a local grocery store. Being a down homer was also reflected in his promotion of education for the area. During his almost fifty year career as a school principal and teacher, he professed a hope for Hatteras Island to have a central accredited high school.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p72-77