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14 results for Our State Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014
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Record #:
21784
Abstract:
Charleen Swansea graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1956, taught there for one year, then at Queens College in Charlotte until 1964. She was fired from the college for being \"too courageously creative.\" She and her students then formed a writing group and created the Red Clay Reader, a magazine for writers with deep roots in the Southern soil. It had a run of seven years. She then founded her own publishing company, Red Clay Publishers, which has printed 32 books by Southern writers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p36, 38-39, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21783
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Eades explains how the Catawba River Valley Pottery tradition developed, what makes it unique, who saved it from vanishing, and its status in the 21st century. The pottery is created in Catawba and Lincoln counties, and the area is one of only three continuously surviving pottery traditions in the whole country--Seagrove in the Piedmont, the Native Americans in Arizona, and the Catawba Valley.
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21792
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Latham \"Bum\" Dennis founded Bum's, the well-known Ayden barbecue restaurant, in 1963, and it's been a mainstay ever since. Bum and his son Larry make wood-smoked eastern-style barbecue, and for barbecue lovers that is all the advertising they need to come to this unpretentious restaurant.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p57-58, 60, 62, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21788
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Tomlin looks back to the 1970s when, for a short period of time, college students cast aside their inhibitions (and clothes) and became streakers across their college landscapes. It appears that Western Carolina University has the honor of having the first streakers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p42-44, 46, 48, 50, 52, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21803
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Tomlinson recounts the origins of the Plott hound, North Carolina's state dog as of 1999, and its continuance into the 21st Century as a hunting dog, cattle and goat herder, and family protector.
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21806
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The Uwharrie Mountains National Forests is one of the country's smallest. Yet among the trees, shadows, and darkness lurks another creature similar to Bigfoot. Over the past forty years there have been reported sightings and footprints four inches across the heel and eight across the toes. Michael Greene, who oversaw 250 investigators as Chief of Welfare and Food Stamp Fraud Investigation in New Jersey and who also is a \"court qualified expert witness\" on fraud, captured the best piece of evidence seen in 40 years. In 2009 he set up a thermal imager and digital video recorder in the woods and left. When he returned, the device had recorded a lumbering figure with long arms. Bigfoot? Mystery as yet unsolved.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p78-80, 82, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21804
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War Memorial Stadium opened in 1926 in Greensboro as a dedication to the soldier boys of World War I. For over seventy-five years baseball teams played there, but by 1998 deterioration was claiming the structure. Its time had passed, but the great memories lingered. While NC A & T University plays games there, a decision on what to do with the stadium is still pending.
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Record #:
21805
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The easy part is choosing a list of poems from the state's numerous poets, but bringing that list down to just ten that capture North Carolina is not. These ten come from \"exhaustive research, debate, and compromise.\" The list includes poetry by A.R. Ammons, George Moses Horton, and Ron Rash. The introduction to the collection is written by Billy Collins, a two-term Poet Laureate of the United States.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p66-72, 74, 76-77, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21808
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Wilmington has celebrated its Azalea Festival since 1948, when the azaleas open with red, purple, pink, white, and orange colors. This is the time when the Azalea Belles appear as part of the festival. This is a group of 137 young women wearing period costumes of the Old South. Each woman receives a handmade hoop dress, frilly gloves, and a parasol. Bass describes what is required of the Belles during the festival.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p86-88, 90-92, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21809
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The Turchin Center for the Visual Arts at Appalachian State University at Boone is exhibiting until June 7 photographs that were finalists for the 11th Annual Appalachian Mountain Photography Competition. In this magazine collection are photographs that best present the Appalachian landscapes, flora, and people.
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Record #:
21819
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The Toe River Valley in Marshall and Yancey counties is a hotbed for the arts. The population of the two counties is around 30,000 and of that number it is estimated that more than 500 are artists--one of the highest concentrations of artists in the world. Markovich states there are two reasons for this--Harvey Littleton and the Penland School of Crafts at Spruce Pine. Littleton, who came to Spruce Pine in 1977, gained recognition first as a ceramist and later as a glassblower and sculptor in glass. Penland, founded in 1929 by Lucy Morgan, has gained world-wide recognition as a destination for artists.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p132-136, 138, 140-142, 144, 146, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21817
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Jens Kruger and his brother Uwe grew up in Switzerland. He recounts growing up in a musical home and the discovery when they were teenagers of a recording from a place they had never heard of (North Carolina) and the two players, Earl Scruggs and Doc Watson. He goes on to relate coming to North Carolina in 1982, meeting Bill Monroe, playing at the Grand Ole Opry, and in 1997, he and Uwe played at MerleFest. Today, the brothers live in the state and travel this country and the world playing the music they discovered as teenagers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p124-126, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21818
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Cratis Williams was born in the mountains of eastern Kentucky. He grew up to be a storyteller, balladeer, linguist, scholar of Appalachia, and teacher. In 1942, he came to Appalachian State in Boone and by 1958 was dean of the graduate school. It was his love of Appalachia, its people and lore, that helped inspire a special library collection, the W.L. Eury Appalachian Collection that is known world-wide.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p128, 130, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22175
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The American Civil War was a brutal, bloody event in our history, but there is a period when most of the fighting ceases--the four-month winter period of bad weather and terrible roads. Soldiers on both sides do many activities to pass the time. One activity that helps soldiers on both sides, even those held in prisons, escape the horrors of war throughout the year is baseball. Gerard explains baseball's popularity and how Salisbury Prison in Western NC became a center for its playing.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p182-188, 190, il Periodical Website
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