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16 results for Our State Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012
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Record #:
17030
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Chip Holton has created sketches, landscapes, watercolors, portraits, murals and sculptures and had built houses and designed buildings. Twenty years ago he met Dennis Quaintance, an hotelier from Greensboro who owned the Proximity Hotel and the O. Henry Hotel. When he was building the Proximity in 2006, Quaintance hired him to do all the artwork for the rooms--500 works of art--to be finished by summer's end. When he finished, Holton was hired to paint for the O. Henry and given the title Artist-in-Residence. To date, he has completed over 800 works of art for Quaintance.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012, p19-21, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
17031
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John Montgomery came to Raleigh in 1983 and opened a shop on Hillsborough Street where he makes hand-crafted violins and repairs other stringed instruments. A graduate of the Violin Making School of America, located in Salt Lake City, he tries to make a quartet a year--two violins, a viola, and cello.
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Record #:
17036
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Graff describes Hurricane Hazel, one of the most powerful hurricanes to strike North Carolina. It came ashore October 15, 1954, on the North Carolina/South Carolina line with wind speed of 150 MPH. In the state nineteen people were killed and two hundred were injured. Damage was in the millions.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012, p46-52, 54, 56-61, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
17035
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Elkin, located in Surry County, is featured in OUR STATE's Tar Heel Town of the Month section.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012, p34-36, 38, 40, 42-43, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17039
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Gerard discusses the burdens of war that soldiers carry in addition to their normal knapsacks, rifles, and blanket rolls.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012, p64-68, 70, 72, 74, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17051
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Asheville's River Arts District is a mile long and half-a-mile wide; it can be walked in less than fifteen minutes. The area comprises eighteen buildings which were once the city's industrial riverfront warehouses. Local artists have been converting the old buildings into studios which now provide space for 165 artists and crafters to work.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012, p80-93, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
17056
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The historic Carolina Inn, located on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is marking its eighty-eighth year. Hughes recounts some of its history and the amenities it offers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012, p110-114, 116, 118-119, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17057
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Selena Einwechter operates the Bed & Breakfast on Tiffany Hill located in Mills River, Henderson County. Hudson describes the inn's amenities, Einwechter's life, and how she became the inn's owner.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012, p126-130, 132, 134, 136, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
17058
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Mitchell Minges began Hospitality Mints as a family business in Boone in 1976. These are the little mints customers find as they pay their bills on leaving the restaurant. The company uses 50,000 pounds of sugar to produce seven million mints each day, which adds up to over a billion each year.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012, p166, 168-169, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17774
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At Biltmore Estate in Asheville, most of the organic features are purely for presentation. But some of the plots of sunflowers, soybeans, corn, and clover are there to entice animals to grace the grounds.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012, p180-182, 184, 186, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
17773
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The pawpaw, a native fruit to North Carolina, is hard to explain. It grows on tree like an apple, grows in bunches like grapes, and ripens like peaches in late summer--but it has a flavor and other characteristics all its own.
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Record #:
17770
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The North Carolina Press Association, founded in 1873 by a group of editors in Goldsboro, has had a history of helping state newspapers with legal support.
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Record #:
17771
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A new exhibit at Cameron Art Museum in Wilmington uses spools of thread from abandoned mills to highlight North Carolina's textile industry.
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Record #:
17772
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Markovich tells the modern story of North Carolina's largest city, Charlotte.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012, p138-144, 146, 148, 150, 152, 154, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
17776
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Standing alone in the Albemarle Sound, the Roanoke River lighthouse once seemed out of place, but for more than fifty years it has served its humble purpose to mark the mouth of the Roanoke River. With a rich history since its commission in 1887, the Roanoke River Lighthouse has a new exterior and a home right where it started.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012, p191-192, il Periodical Website