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10 results for Our State Vol. 79 Issue 5, Oct 2011
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Record #:
15169
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Abstract:
Southport, located in Brunswick County, is featured in Our State magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 5, Oct 2011, p36-40, 42, 44, 46, 48-50, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15171
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Author Daphne Athas came to Carrboro with her family after the Great Depression. Now 87, her writing career includes four published novels, a poetry collection, a play, and a number of nonfiction books and essays. She is a two-time winner of the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for Fiction. Besides her own writing, Athas taught creative writing at UNC-CH for forty-one years, from 1968 to 2009.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 5, Oct 2011, p20-221, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
15170
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The Tar River Boys have played mountain music in their own lively style for the past forty years. An interesting feature of the group is the fact that none are from the state's mountains; all are from the flatlands of the eastern part of North Carolina. Tar River Boys released a CD in 2009 titled \"Bluegrass and More.\"
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Record #:
15237
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For the first two years of the Civil War captured soldiers were exchanged and allowed to return to their units. Soon commanders on both sides realized this was an untenable situation, and each made plans for a prison system. Gerard describes North Carolina's infamous prison at Salisbury, where over 15,000 prisoners were held in miserable sanitary conditions and food and clothing were scarce. Prisoners lived in holes dug into the ground. Over 5,000 died. On April 12, 1865, General George Stoneman assaulted Salisbury, liberating the remaining prisoners and burning the prison and the town.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 5, Oct 2011, p66-68, 70, 72, 74-76, 78, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15236
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An engineer's misunderstood message caused the collision of two trains near Linwood Station in Davidson County disrupting the tour of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. Ordered to pull into a siding to allow passage of the show train, the engineer then pulled his freight train back onto the tracks, unaware that a second show train was following. Myers recounts the aftermath of the collision.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 5, Oct 2011, p56-58, 60, 62, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
15281
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The Snowbird Mountain Lodge, located near Robbinsville in Graham County, was built in 1941 and sits on a ridge at nearly 3,000 feet. Naturalists, birdwatchers, honeymooners, and hikers all frequent the lodge which offers the comforts of home in beautiful surroundings. Alabamian Robert Rankin fell under its spell thirty years ago, and in 1995 he and his wife became the owners. Now divorced, Rankin operates the lodge with the help of his daughters in the summer and on school vacations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 5, Oct 2011, p130-132, 134-136, 138, 140, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
15280
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The Cherohala Skyway runs from North Carolina's border with Tennessee to Big Santeelah Creek, a distance of eighteen miles. Lying in the remote southwestern part of the state, it provides drivers spectacular views of the Great Smoky Mountains. The total length of the road is forty-three miles, and it took forty years and $100 million to construct in what was long thought impassable country.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 5, Oct 2011, p108-110, 112-116, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15282
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The Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest is 3,800 acres of forest lying in Graham County. What makes this forest unique is that it's the last virgin forest on the East Coast. The trees have never been touched by an axe and will remain so. It was dedicated in 1936 to the American soldier-poet, Joyce Kilmer, who wrote the famous poem \"Trees,\" and was later killed in World War I on July 30, 1918.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 5, Oct 2011, p162-168, 170, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
38303
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Abstract:
Originally known as the Governor’s Palace, Tryon Palace’s restoration in the late 1950s also entailed rebuilding its grounds. In this part of the project, preservationists had to employ educated guesswork and imagination more than archaeo-historical evidence.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 5, Oct 2011, p196-198, 200, 202, 204, 206, 208 Periodical Website
Record #:
38302
Author(s):
Abstract:
Originally known as the Governor’s Palace, Tryon Palace’s restoration in the late 1950s also entailed rebuilding its grounds. In this part of the project, preservationists had to employ educated guesswork and imagination more than archaeo-historical evidence.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 5, Oct 2011, p196-198, 200, 202, 204, 206, 208 Periodical Website