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6 results for North Carolina Naturalist Vol. 25 Issue 4, Fall 2017
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Record #:
34619
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Folklore has often cast the black cat, screech owl, and doodlebug in a bad light. In Frank C. Brown’s books “The Folklore of North Carolina”, he postulates that these creatures are omens of bad luck. This article explores these native North Carolina species, how they got reputations as bad omens, and where to find them in the state.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 25 Issue 4, Fall 2017, p2-3, il
Record #:
35344
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This collection contained nearly 600 photographs, some labeled, others not, of fossil invertebrate specimens. Paul Brinkman believed the discovery of this collection compiled in the late nineteenth century could contribute to new research ventures in paleontology.
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Record #:
35343
Abstract:
Kelcee L. Smith and Annmarie Fearing’s Summer 2017 research study's goal: to understand how the factor of genetic diversity could have contributed to the sawfish’s declining population. With a greater understanding, the authors hope to contribute to this creature’s conservation.
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Record #:
35342
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Highlighted by Cindy Lincoln was epizoochory, aka “hitchhikers,” seeds and fruits that attach themselves to other living things. As to why hitchhikers such as the profiled Southern Sandbur have this feature, she explained that it’s to disperse seeds. Another similarity noted was the areas hitchhikers habituate: where humans and other mobile creatures haunt.
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Record #:
35345
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Tony Rice and Christina Roche were among the five authors that produced this article. Profiled was 2017’s Girl Scout Gold Award recipient. Also profiled were projects discussing the evolution of flight in winged and non-winged creatures; a tree destroyed by Hurricane Irma grown from seeds carried aboard Apollo 14; eclipse glasses for the Great American Eclipse of 2017, a dinosaur atlas created for children, and the role cheese plays in human health.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 25 Issue 4, Fall 2017, p9-10
Record #:
35346
Author(s):
Abstract:
What captured paleontologist David Button’s attention about dinosaurs’ diet was how they adapted to the more difficult to digest plants. Bodily features aiding in this evolutionary trend was the cranium and mandible. Dentition was another anatomical aspect noted by the author.
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