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6 results for North Carolina Naturalist Vol. 23 Issue 4, Fall 2015
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Record #:
34615
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Abstract:
At Prairie Ridge at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, a new roost tower has been built to accommodate thousands of chimney warblers. Just after completion of the tower, birds swifts had already begun to nest inside, encouraging the building of smaller towers around the area.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 23 Issue 4, Fall 2015, p2-3, il
Record #:
35434
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Abstract:
A partnership was struck between scientists and illustrators to capture the artistry in anatomical design. This aspect, Meg Eberle disclosed, is not always possible in photography. Included in the article are illustrations of illustrators from centuries past, such as Charles R. Knight, and contemporary times, such as Liz Bradford.
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Record #:
35437
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Abstract:
According to Tracey Peake, what made the tail in the ankylosaur’s tale noteworthy were these speculations: its tail club construction; and which part of the tail club’s anatomy developed first.
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Record #:
35435
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Abstract:
The dragon in this case was not associated with knights, but was of the insect variety. The dragon fly that Dr. Jason Cryan discussed in this article, Phrictus tripartitus, was noteworthy for two reasons. One, its large size (lending it a fearsome appearance) and two, rarity (15 species known in the world).
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Record #:
35433
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Abstract:
Extreme ran the gamut from small to great in this North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences exhibit that ran through March 27th, 2016. Examples of anatomical features noted in the article for these showcased mammals were claws, fangs, snouts, and horns. Animals became accessible for visitors’ experience via visual displays, touchable fossils, and taxidermied specimens.
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Record #:
35436
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Abstract:
Included in this issue’s collection of profiles were mice, chipmunks and the Thad Eure Jr. Memorial and Wake County Public School System School-to-Career Clouncil Outstanding Volunteer award winners. Also noteworthy were a toe bone discovery, family tree chronicle, and survival stories of the mice, chipmunks, and prehistoric birds that told evolutionary tales extending far beyond their animal owners.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 23 Issue 4, Fall 2015, p9-10