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5 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 2 Issue 3, July 1925
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Record #:
19609
Abstract:
Continued from April 1925, Vol. 2(2), pp. 147-161. Randolph Shotwell served time at three different Federal prisons during his lifetime and recorded his experiences at each. Captured during the Civil War in 1864 he was first confined at Point Lookout, Maryland, then was moved to Fort Delaware where he remained until the end of the war. In 1871 he was convicted on false evidence in the Ku Klux Conspiracy and sentenced to six years at the Federal Penitentiary in Albany, NY before being pardoned by President Grant after serving two years. An examination of his time at Fort Delaware is presented in this second installment.
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Record #:
19607
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In the colonial period, the French and English competed for the favor of several Indian tribes. One of the most powerful of the Southern tribes, the Cherokee were known for selling furs of great value and were strategically located in upper South Carolina and Georgia, the heart of the western North Carolina Mountains, and in southwestern Tennessee. The Cherokee were sought as allies by both the French and the English and the rivalry between the two for the active aid of this tribe was at its height during of the French and Indian War.
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Record #:
19608
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Slavery in North Carolina was not addressed or recognized legally or by a governing body until it was given legal status by the General Assembly in 1715. From that point and continuing throughout the 18th- and 19th-centuries, laws were passed that gradually shaped the treatment and rights of slaves and an examination of these changes and of other efforts to effect changes in the law illustrate the attitudes of the people of North Carolina towards slaves' rights in this period.
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Record #:
19616
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The third installment of \"Some North Carolina Tracts of the Eighteenth Century,\" by William K. Boyd. John Rutherfurd (1724-1782) was born in Scotland and migrated to North Carolina sometime prior to 1735, settling in Wilmington. He was twice elected town commissioner of Wilmington, appointed by Governor Johnston as a member of the Council and Receiver General of Quit Rents in 1751, and was appointed Lieutenant General of the expedition against the Regulators by Governor Tryon prior to 1768. He wrote \"The Importance of the Colonies to Great Britain, etc.,\" reproduced here in full, in 1761 while in England. The piece examines themes of traditional mercantilism such as the balance of trade between England and the colonies and the future of that balance.
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Record #:
19653
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Henry McCullough, author of \"Miscellaneous Representations Relative to Our Concerns in America,\" 1761, was a holder of vast tracts of land in North Carolina and was once a special agent of His Majesty's Government in the Carolinas. He was the individual behind the policy of Prime Minister George Grenville's Stamp Act.\r\n\r\nMaurice Moore Jr. belonged to a prominent political family in North Carolina who settled in the colony near the lower Cape Fear River. Moore Jr. was a lawyer who represented the borough of Brunswick in the Assembly and was appointed Associate Justice of the Province until his participation in resistance to the Stamp Act. His pamphlet \"Justice and Policy of Taxing the American Colonies in England,\" 1765 centers on the idea that Parliament has no right to tax the colonies and criticizes the claim of virtual representation in Parliament.
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