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9 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 41 Issue 2, Summer/Fall 1994
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Record #:
2241
Abstract:
Dr. Glenn Douglas Hinson, associate professor of anthropology and folklore at UNC-CH, has been recognized for his scholarship in the field of African-American culture; his many folklore projects, like Hmong basketry; and his support for many folk artists.
Record #:
2243
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PineCone, the Piedmont Council of Traditional Music, has received the 1994 Community Traditions Award for its advocacy and presentation of the traditional performing arts and for its commitment to raising public awareness of traditional music and dance.
Record #:
35963
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Abstract:
For more than 50 years, Archie Green made North Carolina a special focus for much of the political-cultural work he chose to do in his quest to comprehend the lives of ordinary people, and to gain appropriate recognition for their expressive culture.
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Record #:
35966
Abstract:
By extending his familial oral narratives to the contemporary revival scent of folktales, Donald Davis made himself a creative artist that moved outside the boundaries of folk traditions. In order to portray the tales that he told, it was necessary to set them in the context of Davis’s family background, personal experiences, and storytelling practices.
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Record #:
35967
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Folklore Society sponsored an annual student contest with the purpose of encouraging student research on state folk life and to recognize significant student projects by publication. There were six winning entries, a graduate first place winner and two honorable mentions, and two undergraduate co-winners and one honorable mention.
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Record #:
35968
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After decades of wanting to be in Rodanthe around the time of Old Christmas, Abrams finally got his chance in 1971. He wanted to see if there was any relationship between his childhood ‘hobby horse’ and the legendary Old Buck.
Record #:
35964
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To Bessie Eldreth, music was a cultural and family legacy that tied her to the past and told her who she was. It was also a legacy to which she added liberally, so that her repertoire memorialized her particular passage through eighty years of the twentieth century.
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Record #:
35969
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While interviewing people about ghostly encounters or stories in Martin County, the author had a string of bad luck in recording the information, which she attributed to the ghost of Bear Grass, who she assumed did not want its story told.
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Record #:
35965
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Abstract:
For over ninety years, Julie Jarrell Lyons shared mountain folkways in the forms of singing, dancing, and telling tales.