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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for McDonald, Mary Anne
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Record #:
1655
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Ebonettes, an African-American women's service club in Tarboro, collaborated with the author to present the Tarboro African American quilt exhibit that combined folk elements with community development.
Record #:
16324
Author(s):
Abstract:
North of Chapel Hill on State Route 86 is what looks like a group of small, white, stone doghouses on the side of the road. About twenty structures form White Rock Village, and they are all the work of one man, Henry Warren. White Rock Village is an intriguing and impressive work of folk art, drawing considerable attention to his use of available materials and traditions patterns of stonemasonry.
Subject(s):
Record #:
4411
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bold colors, strip construction, and improvisation are characteristics of quilts made by Afro-Americans. Colorful quilt materials are sewn together in strips; then the strips are sewn together to make the quilt. Quiltmakers may start with a pattern, but they often vary it to suit themselves. Scholars feel this Afro-American quiltmaking style is influenced by their African heritage.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 27 Issue 2, Spring 1988, p27-28, il, bibl
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Record #:
28889
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Black Folk Heritage Tour, managed by the North Carolina Arts Council’s Folk Life Section, is performing for its third year throughout the state. Performances trace the development of African-American music and dance, and feature traditional art forms firmly rooted in the rural South.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Jan 1988, p7, por
Record #:
35841
Author(s):
Abstract:
Born and raised in Chatham County, Lillie Lee and Jennie Burnett both started making quilts when they were children.
Subject(s):
Record #:
4101
Abstract:
Dwaine C. Coley received a 1998 Brown-Hudson Folklore Award for strong support and promotion of folklorists and folk arts of Western Carolina. Since 1981, he has been executive director of the Hiddenite Center in Alexander County.
Record #:
2241
Abstract:
Dr. Glenn Douglas Hinson, associate professor of anthropology and folklore at UNC-CH, has been recognized for his scholarship in the field of African-American culture; his many folklore projects, like Hmong basketry; and his support for many folk artists.