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9 results for North Carolina Folklore Society--Community Traditions Award
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Record #:
2243
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PineCone, the Piedmont Council of Traditional Music, has received the 1994 Community Traditions Award for its advocacy and presentation of the traditional performing arts and for its commitment to raising public awareness of traditional music and dance.
Record #:
3024
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The N.C. Folklore Society's 1996 Community Traditions Award was given to the Core Sound Decoy Carvers Guild of Harkers Island for perpetuating waterfowl tradition and waterfowl carving and painting.
Record #:
3023
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The North Carolina Folklore Society's Community Traditions Award is given to organizations that make valuable contributions to the state's folklife. The first award was given in 1992 to the Sharp Point Volunteer Fire Department in Pitt County.
Record #:
5397
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The Museum of the Cherokee Indian opened in 1948 on the Qualla Boundary in Western North Carolina. Over 125,000 people visit it annually. The museum received the North Carolina Folklore Society 2001 Community Traditions Award for outstanding contributions to preservation, continuation, and appreciation of Cherokee traditional culture.
Record #:
6840
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The North Carolina Folklore Society's Community Traditions Award originated in 1992 and is given to organizations that make valuable contributions to the state's folk life. The 2003 award was presented to the Foundation for Shackleford Horses, Inc. for championing the wild horses during the 1990s against manmade and natural threats to their long-term survival. Their work resulted in federal legislation in 1998 that gave protection to the horses.
Record #:
7292
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The North Carolina Folklore Society's Community Traditions Award is given to organizations and individuals that make valuable contributions to the state's folklife. Karen Willis Amspacher received the award in 2004 for her publication, THE MAILBOAT, that takes its name from Down East mailboats which brought freight, produce, mail, news, and visiting friends to coastal and island communities in the 19th- and early 20th-centuries.
Record #:
8390
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The North Carolina Folklore Society's Community Traditions Award is given to organizations and individuals that make valuable contributions to the state's folklife. The first award was given in 1992. The Terry family received the 2005 Community Traditions Award for contributions they have made to the heritage and music of the state over the past one hundred years. The family's origin in the Little River Valley date back earlier than 1750. The family comprises the heart of the Doc Branch Band, and they are well-grounded in old-time fiddle and country tunes they learned from their father's generation.
Record #:
8539
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The North Carolina Folklore Society's Community Traditions Award is given to organizations and individuals that make valuable contributions to the state's folk life. The first award was given in 1992. The 2006 Award was presented to Mrs. Nelia Hyatt of Asheville, who has hosted a traditional music jam on her property for more than fifty years. The jam, which is held every Thursday night year-round, features bluegrass, old time, and early country music. Her husband, a talented musician and instrument maker, started the gathering. After his death, she continued it. What is remarkable is that Mrs. Hyatt is not a musician, but continues the tradition because of her love of the music and the people who perform it.
Record #:
10699
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mrs. Nelia Hyatt of Asheville has hosted a traditional music jam on her property for more than fifty years. The jam, which is held every Thursday night year-round, features bluegrass, old time, and early country music. Her husband, a talented musician and instrument maker, started the gathering. After his death, she continued it. What is remarkable is that Mrs. Hyatt is not a musician, but continues the tradition because of her love of the music and the people who perform it.
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