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9 results for New East Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976
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Record #:
5978
Author(s):
Abstract:
Planter, soldier, and politician, General Robert Howe probably was the most dashing and most controversial Revolutionary War leader from North Carolina. Howe was a supporter of anti-British resistance from the very beginning.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p33-34, 55, por
Record #:
5977
Author(s):
Abstract:
On October 25, 1774, Penelope Barker organized fifty women to participate in the Edenton Tea Party, in order to tell the government in England what North Carolina women were prepared to do to resist repressive laws. Griffin discusses the event, which was \"the earliest instance of political activity on the part of women in the American colonies.\"
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p24-27, il
Record #:
5979
Author(s):
Abstract:
Flora MacDonald was a Scottish heroine who saved the life of \"Bonnie Prince Charlie,\" claimant to the British throne. Later she and her husband came to North Carolina hoping for a better life. They remained loyal to England during the Revolution; this angered many of their neighbors and forced their departure back to Scotland, where they lived out their lives.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p37-39, por, map
Record #:
5976
Author(s):
Abstract:
Patterson takes the reader back to a colonial kitchen among the tryvets, spyettes, chauldrons, and gibcrokes, where cooks prepared \"possum laced with potatoes, Hopping John, and a frothy drink called Syllabub.\" Readers will find the kitchen and utensils quite different from those of today.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p19-22, 49, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
35504
Author(s):
Abstract:
NC's celebration of the US’ birthday wasn’t confined on ship. It also involved cruising by places on land that showcased NC’s contribution to America’s history. There were towns such as Edenton, Bath, and New Bern. It included dwellings like Orton Plantation, the Benjamin Wright House, and Tryon Palace. Also were landmarks such as the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Wright Brothers Memorial, and Blockade Runner Museum.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p8-10, 12-14
Record #:
35505
Author(s):
Abstract:
Celebration of America’s two hundredth anniversary included reliving a special part of US history. To help celebrants virtually step back in time were re-enactments of Colonial lifeways. It ranged from domestic chores such as cooking to clothes-making, from meal staples such as apple cider and corn, from entertainment such as Cock Fight and marbles. The history lesson learned: there were more commonalities than differences between the distant past and the present.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p15-17, 46
Record #:
35506
Author(s):
Abstract:
Her story was an illustration of the important role women play in history, pre-American Colonial and Colonial in particular. While the men helped to hold the fledging nation together on the battlefield, women helped to hold the fledgling nation together on the homefront. Where Flora’s story becomes especially memorable is her influence felt before immigrating from Scotland to North Carolina. That venture commemorated in this edition involved her helping the pretender to the British throne, Bonnie Prince Charlie, escape to France in 1746.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p37-39
Record #:
35508
Author(s):
Abstract:
If history has two faces, as the author proclaimed, history textbooks have often held a mirror in front of one of those visages. Bunger’s purpose, then, was to make the other countenance, in this case the European slave trade, just as visible.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p40-43
Record #:
35507
Author(s):
Abstract:
Her story was an illustration of the important role women play in history, pre-American Colonial and Colonial in particular. While the men helped to hold the fledging nation together on the battlefield, women helped to hold the fledgling nation together on the homefront. Where Flora’s story becomes especially memorable is her influence felt before immigrating from Scotland to North Carolina. That venture commemorated in this edition involved her helping the pretender to the British throne, Bonnie Prince Charlie, escape to France in 1746.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p37-39