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8 results for North Carolina--History--American Revolutionary War, 1775-1783--Edenton
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Record #:
1925
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Abstract:
Although considered a significant event in North Carolina's Revolutionary period, many questions still surround Edenton's Tea Party of October 25, 1774. Arthur describes the event and addresses questions concerning its authenticity.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 5, Oct 1994, p13-14, il
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Record #:
4965
Abstract:
The first recorded women's political rally in America took place when Penelope Barker organized fifty women to participate in the Edenton Tea Party on October 25, 1774, in order to send the English government a message of what women in North Carolina were prepared to do to resist repressive laws. Smith recounts the life of this revolutionary woman.
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Record #:
4964
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Abstract:
Edenton was a hotbed of revolutionary fervor when the American nation was coming into being. Among its contributions were a signer of the Declaration of Independence, a signer of the U.S. Constitution, and the Edenton Tea Party. Huso describes the patriots, protestors, and politicians who peopled these momentous times in Edenton.
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Record #:
5977
Author(s):
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On October 25, 1774, Penelope Barker organized fifty women to participate in the Edenton Tea Party, in order to tell the government in England what North Carolina women were prepared to do to resist repressive laws. Griffin discusses the event, which was \"the earliest instance of political activity on the part of women in the American colonies.\"
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p24-27, il
Record #:
8741
Abstract:
A satirical mezzotint depicting the Edenton Tea Party of 1774 was found at a shoemaker's shop in Ciudadela in 1826. In 1774, a group of fifty-one Edenton women gathered and signed a resolution against drinking tea. News of their tea party spread to London where the mezzotint was made, probably by artist Philip Dawe. Over the years, the mezzotint was shattered and only two-thirds of it has been successfully restored. It once again disappeared, but, years later, it was rediscovered by William Easterling in his bank in Edenton.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p16-18, il
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Record #:
9571
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Abstract:
The town of Edenton is guarded by several cannons which were shipped there in July 1778. The citizens, however, had not expected their arrival, and they did not have the funds to pay for them. Later, it was discovered that American agents in France had arranged the order and never notified Edenton's citizens. Fearing that Lord Cornwallis might seize them on his way to Virginia in 1781, townspeople dumped the cannons into the river. In 1785, the cannons were raised and are again stationed around the town. They were never fired in defense of the town.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 10, Mar 1984, p15-17, il
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Record #:
10045
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Abstract:
Penelope Barker had had an eventful life even before the famous Edenton Tea Party. She had three husbands and lost two to death; the third died in 1787. She bore six children, mothered three of her first husband's, and saw eight of her children die. The Edenton Tea party took place on October 25, 1774 and is the first recorded women's political rally in America. Barker organized fifty women to participate in order to send the English government a message of what women in North Carolina were prepared to do to resist repressive laws.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 2 Issue 7, Nov 1944, p15-17, il, por, bibl
Record #:
12311
Abstract:
On October 25th, 1774, fifty-one women in Edenton met at the home of Mrs. Elizabeth King, signing a resolution not to drink tea until the taxes placed upon the commodity had been removed.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 20, Feb 1958, p15, il
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