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13 results for New East Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973
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Record #:
5835
Abstract:
The Great Dismal Swamp, an area of history and mystery, sprawls across North Carolina's northeastern corner and southeastern Virginia. No one knows who discovered it or when. The author discusses historical events and persons connected with the swamp.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p24-26, 28-29, il
Record #:
5834
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's state parks are developed with historical as well as natural uniqueness. Taylor profiles several of these including Fort Macon, Hammocks Beach, and Pettigrew State Park.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p16-18, il
Record #:
5864
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carolina bays, thousands of shallow, elliptical depressions in the earth's surface, stretch from Georgia northward, with most being found in the Carolinas. Some bays have water; others are dry. Brooks describes a particular bay known as Black Lake in Bladen County that was reclaimed, restored, and renamed Bay Tree Lake.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p34-35, il
Record #:
5863
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carteret County, located along the state's southeastern coast, is NEW EAST magazine's featured county of the month. Simpson discusses the history of the county and what attracts tourists.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p20-23, il
Record #:
35567
Author(s):
Abstract:
The attraction to the area, also known as the “Crystal Coast” or “Down East,” could be felt far and wide, extending from natives to visitors who became residents. Some of the hooks that this waterborne region could boast: pier fishing, big game fishing; charter boats. Other appealing aspects catered to land lovers. One, a thriving historical society, interests ranging from the area’s Colonial origins to association with Blackbeard. Another was the Croatan National Forest, a refuge for wildlife and hunter alike.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p20-23
Record #:
35568
Author(s):
Abstract:
This patch of swamp, ironically called barely habitable, has generated life and livelihood over the past two centuries. During its Colonial life: construction site for a canal, spearheaded by George Washington. During its Confederate past: inspiration for novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe. Early twentieth century: moneymaker site for commercial tour boat owners. Today: debating ground for establishing public recreation or water management sites.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p24-26, 28-29
Record #:
35566
Author(s):
Abstract:
A guide was offered in terms of history, recreational activities, and nearby waterways through state parks. Profiled were Fort Macon, Hammocks Beach, Pettigrew, Somerset Place, Jones Lake, Singletary Lake Group Camp, Masonboro, and Cliffs-of-the-Neuse. Proof of eight wonders of the world, they were ones also perhaps not known to the international traveler.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p16-18, 29
Record #:
35564
Author(s):
Abstract:
A study in contrasts was the two bikes, the first given at age ten, the other purchased recently. One was light as a feather, the other seemingly weighed half a ton. One was easy to navigate up hills, the other hard to get up the front steps. With the benefits the more recent of the two offered, trips through towns like Edenton or Beaufort seemed less like exercise and more like joy rides.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p10, 37, 42
Record #:
35563
Author(s):
Abstract:
Standing by as a silent testament to the enduring importance of waterway safety were lighthouses. Half can boast being the oldest (Ocracoke, 1823), the tallest (Cape Hatteras, 208 feet), and is the brightest (Oak Island, 20,000,000 candlepower) in America.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p8, 29
Record #:
35570
Author(s):
Abstract:
The new waterway, renamed Bay Tree Lake, was almost a decade in the making. As for the years of investment, testimony that it will be worth it was measured in economic impact. That was defined in the construction of golf courses, tennis courts, playgrounds, pools, and marinas.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p34-35
Record #:
35565
Author(s):
Abstract:
An aerial view of the Outer Banks offers sights like the Cape Hatteras lighthouse and Wild “Banker” Ponies. The treasures not viewable by the naked eye lie in the briny deep: remains of Spanish galleons, colonial brigantines, Confederate steamers, WW I freighters, and U-boats.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p13-15, 42
Record #:
35569
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two observations offered an explanation for its ability to help anglers reel in the catch of the day. One was its ability to sink slowly; the other, its resemblance to forms of aquatic insects.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p30-32
Subject(s):
Record #:
35571
Author(s):
Abstract:
The troop of theatrical productions was the collaborative brainchild of ECU’s President, Leo Jenkins, and Chairman of the Drama Department, Edgar Loessin. A plethora of plays were packed into July and August, starting with Applause and My Fair Lady. The celebration continued with H.M.S Pinafore and Company. The showcasing of talent concluded with regular and matinee performances of You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p46-47