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9 results for Indy Week Vol. 34 Issue 23, June 21 2017
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29061
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Jairo Garcia del Cid fled from gangs and violence in El Salvador, arriving in Durham in May 2016. He enrolled in high school and planned to apply for permanent asylum in North Carolina, but in March he was arrested for larceny of a motor vehicle. Garcia del Cid could be deported because the Durham County Sheriff’s Office does not participate in a federal immigration program.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 23, June 21 2017, p8-9, por Periodical Website
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29062
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The mobile food business is rapidly growing in the Triangle area, with more than a hundred food trucks in Durham County alone. This is a review of the top ten food trucks in the Triangle including the newest truck, Brinehaus. The menus feature innovative takes on dumplings, taquitos, sandwiches, and more.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 23, June 21 2017, p10-12, por Periodical Website
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29063
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Where and when food trucks can park is determined by city and county governments in North Carolina, creating a system of differing ordinances and confusing logistics for customers. The various ordinances require food trucks to park at certain locations, distances, and times.
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29069
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The Southern Oral History Program, a branch of University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South, has been collecting oral histories from the South for more than forty years. The lack of Asian stories led to a new project called Southern Mix, which will focus on collecting Asian oral histories about immigration, assimilation, and the blending or preservation of cultures.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 23, June 21 2017, p25, por Periodical Website
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29064
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Steve and Sam Goff are owners of the new food truck, Brinehaus Meat and Provisions. The couple culminated one of the most vibrant food scenes in the state before moving to Raleigh in 2015. The Goffs operate their food truck using sustainable energy from solar panels, and plan to collaborate with chefs to cook for the homeless.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 23, June 21 2017, p13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29067
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Anthony Greenup, a former Harlem Globetrotter basketball player, started a food truck in Cary, North Carolina. Inspired by his childhood in Louisiana, Baton Rouge Cuisine serves authentic Cajun and Creole cooking. The food truck’s menu features classic dishes such as gumbo, etouffees, and boudin balls, as well as Greenup’s signature “Who Dat” remoulade sauce.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 23, June 21 2017, p17, por Periodical Website
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29068
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Pittsboro, North Carolina is smaller than Triangle cities, yet its handful of trucks thrive without crowds. Food trucks like Tacos Michoacan, Aromatic Roasters, and the Maple View Ice Cream Mobile Unit have regular clients on a regular basis. They gain small-town success by establishing and maintaining relationships, while serving consistent and authentic food.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 23, June 21 2017, p19, por Periodical Website
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29066
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Frank Holloway and his family have four food trucks running in Durham. Frank’s mother, Tootie Holloway, who started the family business in 2008, emphasizes how their success grew by focusing on consistency and tradition in a city in the midst of change. Their food is an effort to keep traditions alive, honoring family recipes and the history of Durham.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 23, June 21 2017, p16, por Periodical Website
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29065
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In an untested market, Durham’s first food trucks found added success in brick-and-mortar locations downtown. Only Burger and Pie Pushers made their move indoors just as the food truck landscape in the Triangle changed precipitously.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 23, June 21 2017, p15, por Periodical Website
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