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23 results for Immigration--Laws and legislation
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Record #:
11045
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Abstract:
Many state and local governments are enacting their own immigration-related laws and ordinances because they feel the federal government is lacking in these areas. Such actions at the state and local levels raise constitutional questions. Zota discusses these constitutional issues.
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Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 117, July 2008, p1-19, f
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Record #:
15632
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Abstract:
In 2009, the board of commissioners for Chatham County unanimously adopted a resolution acknowledging that undocumented immigrants live in and contribute to their communities. The resolution went on to ask the local law enforcement decline to enter into agreements with Immigrations and Customs Enforcement to enforce federal immigration laws. Recent voting to rescind this resolution is causing problems associated with racial profiling, civil rights violations, and immigration concerns.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 23, June 2011, p11 Periodical Website
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Record #:
15633
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SCAAP is a federal program administered through the Bureau of Justice Assistance that provides funds to local law enforcement agencies. Law enforcement receives the money to jail undocumented immigrants who have been convicted of one felony or two misdemeanors. Congress is proposing cutting the program by more than 60 percent by 2012.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 23, June 2011, p13, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
16032
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Over the past five years, Hispanic immigration has hit a critical mass in North Carolina as a result of explosive population growth among immigrant populations. In an effort to address this trend, several of North Carolina's towns and counties have passed explicitly anti-immigrant ordinances.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 32 Issue 2, Summer 2007, p36-46
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Record #:
16287
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Sorg details the difficulties facing undocumented immigrants in North Carolina.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Mar 2012, p7, 49, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
16834
Author(s):
Abstract:
Viridiana Martinez came to the state when she was seven when her father obtained a visa to work tobacco fields. She is now an active member of the N.C. Dream Team which is an organized group of immigrants and their allies. She comments on President Obama's recent DREAM Act and expresses both her hope for further reform on immigration policy and disappointment that the president has not acted more decisively.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 26, June 2012, p7, 9, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
20054
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Abstract:
This bulletin provides state and local officials with an introduction to immigration law, policy and procedures, and provides a broad picture of non-citizens in North Carolina.
Source:
Immigration Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7814 .A15 I45), Vol. Issue 1, Nov 2008, p1-7, f
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Record #:
24165
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Hispanic immigration in North Carolina is decreasing. After two decades in which the state had the nation's fastest Hispanic growth, it is unclear why Hispanics have abandoned North Carolina or are arriving at a much slower rate. Some blame the recession and increased illegal immigrant laws.
Record #:
24209
Author(s):
Abstract:
Illegal immigration is suppressing wages in North Carolina, but it is also creating new undercuts, which help businesses flourish. Without Hispanics, the state economy would come to a standstill because people would pay more for foreign goods rather than make them in the United States.
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Record #:
25559
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Abstract:
UNC researchers Hannah Gill and Mai Nguyen analyzed crime data from five North Carolina counties to investigate the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement 287(g) program. Their analysis revealed high program costs, undocumented residents, and inaccurate arrests. Gill and Nguyen discuss the complexity of Hispanic immigrants in Alamance County and sociopolitical implications.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p40-44, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25776
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Abstract:
Dr. Robert Lee Maril, chair of the East Carolina Department of Sociology, has spent countless hours exploring the lives and work of U.S. Border Patrol agent at McAllen Station in southern Texas. Maril’s work has led to questions about drug trafficking, immigration reform, and organization changes.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2005, p24-27, il Periodical Website
Record #:
26021
Author(s):
Abstract:
Researchers are studying Latino immigrants in North Carolina and the issues they face. According to Altha Cravey, assistant professor of geography, the temporary and fluid domestic and social arrangements constructed by Latino immigrants save money for the United States. However, Latinos struggle for access to health care, education, and civil rights.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Spring 2004, p18-25, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27149
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Wake County participates in an Immigration and Customs Enforcement program known as 287(g), which delegates immigration authority to local law enforcement to deport illegal immigrants. However, opposition to the program advocate for programs that would help immigrants obtain legal status.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 20, May 2016, p10, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27806
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Abstract:
The story of how 31-year old Pedro Guzman was jailed for twenty-months due to a government mistake is detailed. Guzman was granted protected status as a legal immigrant after initially being jailed for a mistake his mother with her routine renewal of a work permit. ICE officials did not notify Guzman of his changed status and jailed him knowing he had no knowledge. He is married to a legal citizen and would have qualified to stay in the US under NACARA, but was still jailed. Guzman and his family describe the effects the event had on their lives and their future goals.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p13 Periodical Website
Record #:
28115
Author(s):
Abstract:
The stories of two siblings from Colombia and their experiences as undocumented immigrants are contrasted. One sibling has obtained legal residency while the other is still undocumented. Some difficulties for undocumented residents in North Carolina include being unable to get a driver’s license, being unable to afford out-of-state tuition for college, struggling to find a well-paying and safe job, and the fear of being deported. Nearly 270,000 North Carolina residents are undocumented and the number is growing each year.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 9, February 2008, p13-19 Periodical Website