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6 results for Food trucks--Durham
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Record #:
16980
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Durham City planners have reworked some of the proposed amendments to the Mobile Vending Provisions ordinance in order to relax rules on food trucks.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 28, July 2012, p9-10, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
23176
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Controversy results after Red Hat Amphitheater signed a deal with Taco Bell, allowing a Taco Bell food truck on its amphitheater grounds. Many locals disagree with bringing in non-local food trucks, but the amphitheater stands by its decision.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 16, April 2015, p23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27156
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Toriano and Serena Fredericks run the Boricua Soul food truck in Durham. Their food speaks to their mixed heritage of Puerto Rico and North Carolina. In response to skeptical questions on the authenticity of their food, the couple says that mixture is what America is.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 20, May 2016, p30-31, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29044
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Cecilia Polanco runs the So Good Pupusas food truck in Durham, catering pupusas and other Salvadoran dishes. Earlier this year, Polanco began a scholarship program to help undocumented immigrants pay for school tuition. She also hopes to use her business to create a mechanism for community members to sell their food out of the truck and make a living.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 19, May 2017, p15, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
29066
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Frank Holloway and his family have four food trucks running in Durham. Frank’s mother, Tootie Holloway, who started the family business in 2008, emphasizes how their success grew by focusing on consistency and tradition in a city in the midst of change. Their food is an effort to keep traditions alive, honoring family recipes and the history of Durham.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 23, June 21 2017, p16, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29065
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In an untested market, Durham’s first food trucks found added success in brick-and-mortar locations downtown. Only Burger and Pie Pushers made their move indoors just as the food truck landscape in the Triangle changed precipitously.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 23, June 21 2017, p15, por Periodical Website
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