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9 results for Friend O’ Wildlife Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982
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Record #:
26887
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since European boar were introduced in 1912, these animals have spread throughout major portions of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Rooting damage caused by the boar could be decreasing the amount of available nutrients for the proper growth of trees. Wildlife biologists are conducting research to assess the extent of impacts and long-term changes.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p5
Record #:
26892
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seven local Audubon chapters have coalesced a North Carolina Audubon Council which coordinates activities and communicates information on state issues of common concern. The Council’s highest priorities in 1982 are promotion of legislation to generate funds for nongame wildlife and natural areas conservation, and protection of barrier islands and wetlands from development.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p12
Record #:
26889
Author(s):
Abstract:
The National Wildlife Federation is calling for support of the Endangered Species Act, currently in the process of congressional reauthorization. While some industry representatives would like to see the law weakened or repealed, the federation is asking for stronger legislative protection of rare wildlife.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p7, por
Record #:
26888
Author(s):
Abstract:
A nature trail honoring wildlife enforcement officers killed in the line of duty was recently dedicated. The Little Walden Nature Trail at Tanglewood Park near Winston-Salem honors six wildlife officers who died in the line of duty since the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission was formed in 1947.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p5
Record #:
26886
Author(s):
Abstract:
The South Carolina Wildlife Federation is opposing the proposed construction of an oil refinery in the Georgetown marsh area, which is a haven for fish, game and wildlife. Further controversy has arisen over a missing environmental impact statement, where critics claim that the assessment was done for a similar refinery in a similar area in North Carolina.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p2, il
Record #:
26890
Author(s):
Abstract:
High school students in the Erwin Rod and Gun Club converted an abandoned landfill and gravel-mine complex into a haven for wildlife and waterfowl, a place to fish, and a shooting range that benefits the entire community. These students have become extremely active in wildlife conservation and are currently building wood duck boxes along the Black River.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p8, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26893
Author(s):
Abstract:
Problems associated with beavers in North Carolina are caused by the flooding of fields or timber. However, farmers can control flooded areas by installing a water-level control device to create a beaver pond and wildlife habitat. Beaver ponds also control siltation and serve as water reservoirs that can recharge depleted underground water supplies.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p12-13, il
Record #:
26891
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Haw River Assembly organized a meeting to discuss water quality, potential fishery development, and environmental management. Speakers included prominent members of state agencies, recreationists, wildlife enthusiasts, and other citizens concerned about conservation practices in the upper Haw River watershed.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p9
Subject(s):
Record #:
26894
Author(s):
Abstract:
Striped bass were tagged and stocked in the Neuse River near New Bern in February. Fishermen returning tags will provide Marine Fisheries biologists with valuable information on fish biology, in addition to receiving a reward.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p12
Subject(s):