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9 results for Endangered species--Laws and legislation
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Record #:
2396
Author(s):
Abstract:
Critics of the Endangered Species Act contend that animal rights take priority over those of landowners. Three state landowners whose property provides a habitat for three different species show that profit can be realized and wildlife also protected.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 43 Issue 2, Summer 1995, p2-5, il
Record #:
25995
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many believe the Endangered Species Act of 1973 has seen a lack of progress in implementation due to insufficient funding and personnel. However, despite certain limitations, several states have already begun cooperative agreements, species have been added to list, while others have been de-listed.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 5, Nov-Dec 1975, p19
Record #:
26425
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since its enactment in 1973, the Endangered Species Act has helped prevent the extinction of numerous plant and animal species. However, the law has also resulted in conflict. In North Carolina, there are controversies over sea turtles and freshwater fish because their protection interferes with development and fishing industry.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1993, p5-8, il
Record #:
26462
Author(s):
Abstract:
This year there is much debate over whether to strengthen or weaken the Endangered Species Act. The dilemma in North Carolina is that with habitat destruction comes the destruction of plants and animals, such as the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker, leatherback sea turtle, and flying squirrel.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 39 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1992, p13, il
Record #:
26889
Author(s):
Abstract:
The National Wildlife Federation is calling for support of the Endangered Species Act, currently in the process of congressional reauthorization. While some industry representatives would like to see the law weakened or repealed, the federation is asking for stronger legislative protection of rare wildlife.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p7, por
Record #:
26937
Author(s):
Abstract:
After a long and vigorous contest between conservationists and industry, the Endangered Species Act has been reauthorized for another three years. The essential rare wildlife protection elements of the Act are intact, overly complex regulations have been trimmed, and many changes requested by industry, sportsmen and Interior have been accommodated.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p7, il
Record #:
9258
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1966, the country did a remarkable thing; it adopted the first of a series of laws and amendments designed to save wildlife. Most of the states have followed the federal government's lead in enacting their own laws and programs to protect locally endangered species. Bass discusses what the laws do and don't do. The article includes the federally listed endangered plants and animals in North Carolina.
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Record #:
3609
Author(s):
Abstract:
Real estate development, habitat destruction, and the illegal pet trade have seriously reduced the bog turtle population. With its recent inclusion within the Endangered Species Act, the turtle is now protected by federal and state law.
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Record #:
19268
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center has recently filed suit against the State of North Carolina to stop the authorization of gill net fishing which is a violation of the Endangered Species Act (ESA).
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