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9 results for Endeavors Vol. 27 Issue 2, Winter 2011
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25534
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At the UNC Microbiome Core Facility, researchers have found that our intestines are full of known and unknown species that compose unique bacterial ecologies. UNC researchers share their findings on the role of bacteria in several ailments, including colitis, Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, diabetes, cystic fibrosis, and colon cancer. They are discovering that probiotics begin to help our health when we are babies.
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25531
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UNC musicologist Annegret Fauser completed a study on the power of classical music during World War Two. In her research, the federal government used music to combat Nazi propaganda and to serve as a form of therapy for soldiers. Her analysis of Library of Congress archives described efforts to recruit musicians, performers, and composers for army duty. Fauser found that for some people who were too old to enlist or get drafted, touring as a musician was a substitute for combat duty.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 2, Winter 2011, p6-13, il, por Periodical Website
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25535
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UNC researcher Carol Otey discovered the protein palladin in 1991. Otey and Teri Brenthall of the University of Washington found palladin to be the source of a genetic mutation in pancreatic cancer. Siince this discovery, Otey and UNC pancreatic researcher H.J. Kim have found nine additional forms of palladin. They believe palladin acts as a protective barrier around tumors to resist chemotheraphy drugs.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 2, Winter 2011, p26-29, il, por Periodical Website
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25532
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The Peutinger map is the only surviving map made by the Romans of their own world in AD 300 and is kept at the Austrian National Library in Vienna. The map was discovered by Konrad Celtis, a treasure hunter who bequeathed the map to Konrad Peutinger, after whom it is named. According to Richard Talbert, a UNC history professor, the purpose of the map was not geography; rather, it served to brag about the glory of Rome and the empire it had become.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 2, Winter 2011, p14-17, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25533
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The Ramphal Cardiac Surgery simulator was designed by Paul Ramphal at the University of the West Indies, and built in Chapel Hill with the help of Richard Feins, UNC professor of surgery. The simulator uses pig parts arranged like they would be in a human, and is used to train medical residents.
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25536
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Mike Sonnichsen is a lecturer and manager of the print and photo labs in the art department. Sonnichsen creates photograms and prismatic prints of plastic objects using an aquatint etching technique. The technique uses an acid bath to produce an array of vivid, watery hues.
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25538
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UNC chemists Vyas Sharma and David Lawrence were funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to diagnose diseases in remote African villages by having people spit on seeds. They hope to turn seeds into a cheap, transportable diagnostic kit by tricking seeds into germinating only when they come into contact with an infected patient’s saliva.
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25537
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Frank Baumgartner, a UNC political scientist, studied lobbyists, interest group advocates, and government officials who worked to change policy or preserve the status quo between 1999 and 2002. After six years of research, Baumgartner found that money was not the determining factor in policy outcomes. Rather, it was the accumulation of bias and influential power already in the political system.
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25539
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Jay Smith, a UNC professor of history, has been studying the Beast of the Gévaudan. The French have argued about the identity of the eighteenth-century creature that killed more than a hundred people in the southern countryside. Smith suggests that the creature was a wolf, but hunters perpetuated the idea that it was a mythological creature to explain his failures out of fear of shame.
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