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7 results for Maps, Early
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Record #:
2193
Author(s):
Abstract:
Prior to 1662 there were no accurate maps of the Carolina coast from Cape Lookout to Port Royal Sound. Six voyages of exploration between 1662 and 1667 added detailed descriptions of previously unknown areas to existing maps.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 4, Oct 1994, p21-29, il, f
Record #:
12369
Author(s):
Abstract:
Set to be released in sections, this portion of Edward Moseley's Map of North Carolina, created in 1733, is the second in a series released by The State.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 24, Apr 1958, p17, map
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Record #:
12371
Author(s):
Abstract:
Set to be released in sections, this portion of Edward Moseley's Map of North Carolina, created in 1733, is the fourth in a series released by The State.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 26, May 1958, p14-15, map
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Record #:
12370
Author(s):
Abstract:
Set to be released in sections, this portion of Edward Moseley's Map of North Carolina, created in 1733, is the third in a series released by The State.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 25, May 1958, p10-11, map
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Record #:
13131
Author(s):
Abstract:
This section of the map shows the northwestern limits of the cartographer's knowledge for the time period. It goes up to the Blue Ridge and stops. The map displays Mulberry Fields as the location of modern Wilkesboro. Today's South Mountains were then called Montague Mountains, and the 'Indian Road' running past Table Rock down to the Catawba River probably was the trail known as the Nickajack Trail.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 12, Nov 1955, p19, map
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Record #:
17011
Author(s):
Abstract:
Roanoke Inlet closed between 1792 and 1798, thus depriving the northeastern North Carolina port towns of an outlet to the Atlantic. In 1820, Hamilton Fulton, civil engineer to the State of North Carolina, devised a plan for reopening the inlet. The project was never undertaken; however, reports of the area provided a detailed account of the dramatic geographic changes that took place in after the Roanoke Inlet closed.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 17 Issue , 2009, p17-25, map, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
25532
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Peutinger map is the only surviving map made by the Romans of their own world in AD 300 and is kept at the Austrian National Library in Vienna. The map was discovered by Konrad Celtis, a treasure hunter who bequeathed the map to Konrad Peutinger, after whom it is named. According to Richard Talbert, a UNC history professor, the purpose of the map was not geography; rather, it served to brag about the glory of Rome and the empire it had become.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 2, Winter 2011, p14-17, il, por Periodical Website
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