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251 results for Currents
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Record #:
4696
Author(s):
Abstract:
An increased load of nutrients and decreased levels of salt and oxygen in the estuaries were short-term effects of Hurricane Floyd's floods. Estuaries also began to recover more quickly than has been expected. The flood did kill a number of slower moving aquatic animals and affect the food supply of fish. What still remains unknown is the flood's lasting effect.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Summer 2000, p3
Record #:
4904
Author(s):
Abstract:
With underground water storage capacity dropping in the fifteen county Central Coastal Plain Capacity Use Area, regulations governing water usage there could be implemented as early as 2002. Some users of over 100,000 gallons of water a day, like towns and factories, would need a special permit and be required to report water use rates to the state.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Winter 2001, p4
Record #:
4903
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bellis discusses how the land surfaces of the North Carolina Coastal Plain were shaped over the eons by the flow of water and why Goose Creek State Park is an excellent place to view the transition zone between brackish marsh and coastal forest.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Winter 2001, p1, 8
Record #:
5337
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission approved rules in 2002 to \"reduce nutrient input of nitrogen and phosphorus to the Pamlico estuary.\" Gannon provides a summary of the rules including buffer protection, nutrient management, stormwater, and agriculture.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 21 Issue 1, Winter 2001, p1, 6
Record #:
5415
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Order of the Long Leaf Pine is the state's highest civilian honor. Joe Hester, attorney and environmentalist, received the award this year for \"guiding the Clean Water Management Trust Fund as its chairman since its creation in 1996 to last year.\" During that time the trust has funded 314 water-quality improvement projects totaling over $258 million.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 21 Issue 3, Summer 2002, p7, por
Record #:
5529
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Southern Environmental Law Center provides a point-by-point argument against Texasgulf's proposed phosphate mining in Beaufort County wetlands and its environmental impact statement.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 12 Issue 3, Spring 1994, pp4-5
Record #:
5934
Abstract:
Three decades of study by federal and state agencies over whether to build jetties at Oregon Inlet has concluded with a decision not to do so. The article discusses what groups were involved, what was considered in this studies, and why the consensus was reached.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 3, Summer 2003, p10
Subject(s):
Record #:
5937
Abstract:
The article discusses the design and operation of swine waste lagoons and the use of waste as an agricultural fertilizer. The role of the North Carolina Division of Water Quality is also discussed.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 3, Summer 2003, p9, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
6726
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sediment is the number one pollution concern across North Carolina. It is the largest nonpoint-source pollutant in the state and one of the main reasons surface water quality has deteriorated. Lane discusses causes of sedimentation and what can be done to prevent or alleviate it.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Spring 2004, p1-2, il
Record #:
7919
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Assembly passed the Clean Smokestacks Act almost four years ago to clean up soot and smog-forming pollution from coal-fired power plants. While the act requires power plants to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions from 245,000 tons in 1998 to 56,000 tons by 2009, it does not say what to do about mercury pollution from those plants. Most of the mercury pollution from these plants falls into nearby water bodies, where, in North Carolina, it is quickly converted to its most toxic form. Suttles discusses what needs to be done to reduce this form of pollution which makes some state fish inedible and threatens developing brains and central nervous systems of young children.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p1, 10, il
Record #:
8371
Author(s):
Abstract:
PSC Phosphate, Inc., has applied to the Army Corps of Engineers for a Clean Water Act Section 404 permit to impact and fill wetlands and waters of the state for the purpose of continuing their mining operations along South Creek in eastern Beaufort County. A similar grant that allowed the company to impact over 1,200 acres of wetlands in 1997 resulted in the largest permitted destruction of wetlands in the history of the state. If the new permit is granted, the Pamlico River basin would lose 2,500 acres of high-quality wetlands.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 25 Issue 4, Fall 2006, p1, 3, map
Record #:
8372
Author(s):
Abstract:
In August 2005, the Pamlico-Tar River Foundation and Clean Water for North Carolina, representing downstream residents, challenged a state issued Special Order of Consent (SOC) for the city of Oxford's wastewater treatment plant. This was the first appeal ever of this kind in the state. The two groups argued that the SOC failed to meet North Carolina's own regulations for dealing with chronic polluters. Jacobs discusses the background of the case, its settlement, present conditions in Oxford, and plans for the future.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 25 Issue 3, Summer 2006, p7-8
Record #:
8378
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since the 1980s, Oxford, located in Granville County, has had trouble managing a compliant wastewater treatment facility. In 2000, the city was fined $100,000, the largest water quality fine in North Carolina to date, and required to enter into a consent judgment order to bring the facility back into compliance, which should have occurred by April 2002. Since 2001, the plant has violated its discharge permit more than seventy times. The Pamlico-Tar River Foundation and Clean Water for North Carolina, representing downstream residents, challenged a state issued Special Order of Consent (SOC) Oxford's wastewater treatment plant. This was the first appeal ever of this kind in the state. The two groups argued that the SOC failed to meet North Carolina's own regulations for dealing with chronic polluters.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Winter 2006, p1, 3, il
Record #:
25132
Author(s):
Abstract:
Not much is known about the spiny mussel which is why some are working harder than ever to get it put on the endangered species list.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1985, p1, 2, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
25133
Author(s):
Abstract:
A large fish kill’s cause cannot be found. The only clue found is sores on the dead fish. A solution is highly sought after so an investigation will ensue.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1985, p1, 4
Subject(s):