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6 results for Coastwatch Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2015
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Record #:
22654
Author(s):
Abstract:
Through unique culture and ecosystems, North Carolina's coastal communities offer varied assets, but these assets also create unique challenges. Population growth and decrease are happening in coastal counties, as well as changes to job composition and commuting. Therefore, there are also changing coastal transportation needs, giving priority to coastal highways, bridges, and ferries.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2015, p6-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22655
Author(s):
Abstract:
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) presents the Walter B. Jones Awards for Coastal and Ocean Resource Management. This year, six recipients are from North Carolina ranging in topics such as construction and erosion, water protection and restoration, sustainable coastal zone use, fisheries and wildlife conservation, science communications, and local government initiatives.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2015, p12-17, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22658
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's coastal region is home to a rich African-American history with locations that reflect the highs and lows for this group during and after slavery. For example, the Great Dismal Swamp became a place of refuge for those seeking freedom before and during the American Civil War as part of the Maritime Underground Railroad. Other places on this route, such as Wilmington, are known for their role in slavery, while James City is known as a place populated by freed blacks.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2015, p28-33, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22656
Author(s):
Abstract:
Historically considered a fine seafood along the East Coast, sturgeon populations collapsed in the early 20th century while those indigenous to North Carolina--Atlantic and shortnose sturgeon--are endangered species. However, two North Carolina businesses are again culturing Russian sturgeon, selling its caviar and meat. To make the fish more popular to markets which are now unfamiliar with it, North Carolina Sea Grant projects aim to aid chefs and biologists bringing sturgeon to the masses.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2015, p18-23, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
22657
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has three students that have been awarded the National Sea Grant College Program's John A. Knauss Scholarship Fellowship. All three hail from Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment and serve in various government departments as program analysts, congressional liaisons, and policy formulators.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2015, p27, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22659
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hydrilla, an invasive species to North Carolina's coastal waters, is being examined by North Carolina Sea Grant specialists in conjunction with Chowan Edenton Environment Group (CEEG) and the Chowan Soil and Water Conservation District in order to reduce the spread. Along with this project, North Carolina is developing an Aquatic Nuisance Species Plan to deal with such invasive species.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2015, p34-37, il, por, map Periodical Website