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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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1217 results for "North Carolina Historical Review"
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Record #:
24872
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When Frederick Law Olmsted went to meticulous lengths when designing the grounds for the Biltmore estate. This included everything from the placement of plants, structures, and roads to the kinds of flora that would be planted and the negotiations to get everything the way he pictured it.
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Record #:
28787
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The burning of the British Fort Johnston by Patriot militia on July 19, 1775 is largely overlooked by historians of the American Revolution in the South. This incident is where the first shots of the American Revolution in North Carolina occurred, not at the battle of Moores Creek Bridge on February 27, 1776. This was an act of sabotage against property owned by King George III and of rebellion against the king of England. This event stopped Gov. Josiah Martin from changing his seat of government, a planned southern military campaign, and marked the end of the royal government in North Carolina.
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21822
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An examination of tourism's social and economic force in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and its role in shaping the history of the post-Civil War South via the development of Victorian consumer culture, a more prosperous middle class, a growing transportation network, and the entrepreneurial development of leisure pursuits and accommodations. Asheville is used as a case study.
Record #:
21491
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This article examines the early years of the life and career of playwright Paul Eliot Green through 1927, when he left the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill after winning the Pulitzer Prize for his play \"In Abraham's Bosom.\" A white Southerner, Green wrote plays about poor blacks, mill workers, and rural whites and stirred controversy with essays on Southern culture and society.
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Record #:
22713
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As early as the 1730s, it was discovered that the environment of the Lower Cape Fear was suited for growing rice, and small-scale rice cultivation flourished. Although the rice industry was often overshadowed by naval stores, it had a long-lasting effect on the colonial economy and laid a foundation for agricultural growth and broader Atlantic trade into the nineteenth century.
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Record #:
21578
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This article examines potential causes for University of North Carolina professor Benjamin Sherwood Hedrick'a steadfast antislavery beliefs which, among other things, led to his dismissal in 1856. The university stated its reasoning for the decision came from its belief that the university was no place for rancorous political debates. Effectively banished from his native North Carolina, Hedrick worked for the US Patent Office in Washington, D.C., and never again lived in North Carolina on a permanent basis.
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Record #:
21577
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A look at The Carolina Political Union (CPU), a political study group founded by students at the University of North Carolina in 1936 to sponsor appearances on campus by political speakers. The university supported CPU, even when speakers chosen were controversial or too liberal - or sometimes even too conservative - unimpeded by the university's progressive and liberal tradition. Within its first five years, the group hosted nearly fifty speakers representing a wide range of the political spectrum, from the head of the Ku Klux Klan to President Franklin D. Roosevelt to labor leaders. The group declined with the onset of WWII, although it did continue to sponsor speakers.
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Record #:
21461
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The first in a series of articles examining the mid-1850s dispute between Congressman Thomas Lanier Clingman and Professor of Sciences at the University of North Carolina, Elisha Mitchell, over who had been the first to identify, ascend, and measure the highest peak in the Black Mountains in Yancey County. The debate took a tragic turn when, in June 1857, Mitchell returned to the Mountains to vindicate his claim and lost his footing and fell to his death.
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Record #:
21470
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The second in a series of articles examining the mid-1850s dispute between Congressman Thomas Lanier Clingman and Professor of Sciences at the University of North Carolina Elisha Mitchell over who had been the first to identify, ascend, and measure the highest peak in the Black Mountains in Yancey County. The debate took a tragic turn when, in June 1857, Mitchell returned to the mountains to vindicate his claim and lost his footing and fell to his death.
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Record #:
22709
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Andrew Jackson's rise in politics in North Carolina was attributed to several factors: his legendary status as general, the desire of North Carolinians to come out of the shadow of Virginia's presidents, his vague stance on tariffs, and most particularly, his stance on internal improvements, where eastern and western portions of the state both supported internal improvement projects, an important factor in the formation of the People's Ticket.
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Record #:
21496
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An examination of the 1790s the fraudulent issuance of land grants during the 1780s in western North Carolina (later Tennessee) carried out by North Carolina secretary of state James Glasgow and others. The prosecution of these officials led to new legislation that resulted in the establishment of what would later become the state supreme court. Glasgow career was ended when he and two others were found guilty, fined, and jailed in June 1800.
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Record #:
21828
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Focusing on the town of Wilmington and the surrounding area, this article focuses on the efforts of white Baptist and Methodist preachers to bring religion to the region, as well as on the role of the Methodist Church in the lives of black evangelicals and their lives as compared to black evangelicals in other parts of the state.
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Record #:
21323
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This article offers a reevaluation of labor protest in the industrial center of High Point, in the early 1930s, focusing on the nature of the struggle and the ability of the workers to express their anger and concerns. A particular focus is placed on strikes driven by the workers' dissatisfaction with low wages, wage cuts, and poor working conditions.
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Record #:
21831
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This article discusses the various celebrations held at Kitty Hawk over the years to mark anniversaries of Orville and Wilbur Wright's first successful powered flight of a heavier-than-air machine in December 1903. There were elaborate ceremonies for the 25th anniversary in 1928, the 50th in 1953, the 75th in 1978, and the dedication of the Wright Memorial in 1932. The article was written in anticipation of the 100th anniversary in December of 2003.
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Record #:
21565
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A look at the political career of lawyer, writer, humorist, religious speaker, television commentator, and two-time candidate for Governor of North Carolina, Herbert Floyd \"Chub\" Seawell Jr.'s run in the 1952 gubernatorial election and its effect of the Republican party and beginning the move to a two-party system within the state. Although Seawell lost the election, he received more votes than any Republican candidate in the state's history at the time, and led the groundwork for a reinvigoration of the of the Republican party by differentiating their platform from that of the Democrats. Seawell advocated \"family values,\" lower taxes, economy in government and played a prominent role in the effort to rid North Carolina Republicanism of the stigma of Reconstruction and the \"evils\" of carpetbaggers.
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