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5 results for Taxation--Businesses
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Record #:
17676
Abstract:
Perhaps the most difficult problem in the administration of a municipal privilege license tax ordinance is the collection of taxes from out-of-town businesses doing business within the municipality. To be fair to resident business who pay their privilege license taxes, the tax collector must collect from non-resident businesses, but often the complexity of laws governing privilege taxes frustrate these efforts.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 20 Issue 5, Feb 1954, p5-10
Subject(s):
Record #:
25178
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are both pros and cons to the new idea of charging corporations a “discharge tax.” This tax would be an incentive to pollute less, however, could allow corporations to purchase the right to pollute.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Spring 1990, p6
Record #:
30504
Abstract:
The Tax Reform Act of 1986 makes substantial changes in the ways that corporations are taxed. This article summarizes some of the more significant changes in business taxes. Some of the changes pertain to corporate tax rates, depreciation methods and the investment tax credit, capital gains, alternative minimum tax, and the General Utilities Doctrine.
Source:
Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 2, July 1987, p2-6, il, bibl, f
Record #:
36298
Author(s):
Abstract:
Contentions between America’s political parties arise from misunderstandings as much as differences of opinion, according to the author. Clearing up some misunderstandings is Hood’s analysis of how the first amendment, tax cuts, war on poverty, and fight to improve education impact American society.
Record #:
36309
Author(s):
Abstract:
Giving a considerable kick-start to America’s economy and job development is small businesses. Experts are hopeful the recent uptick in entrepreneurial ventures will bring the needed economic and occupational boost. The author believes this trend’s continuation includes making establishment of innovative and disruptive businesses possible for the next generation. Hood believed this was possible through activities such as entrepreneurship education programs through 4-H clubs and the Raleigh Children’s Business Fair.