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9 results for 4-H clubs
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Record #:
7997
Abstract:
Where and how 4-H clubs started is unknown since many states claim they started some club of this kind. In North Carolina, 4-H traces its official roots back to a corn club that was organized in Hertford County in 1909 to teach boys farming practices. Guided by Jane S. McKimmon, 4-H clubs for girls were being organized by 1911. Clubs for African-American youth formed in 1914. The various clubs became officially known as 4-H on January 1, 1926. By 1952, North Carolina led the nation in membership, with over 140,000 members enrolled in 2,280 4-H clubs. Westbrook discusses the focus of 4-H clubs through the years.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p100-102,104-106, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
36629
Abstract:
The author gives the beginnings of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service since 1914 showing farm families the new farm and homemaking skills and how to preserve food. This led to Corn Clubs for boys and Tomato Clubs for girls, which in turn became 4-H.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 53 Issue No. 2, , p32, 34, il
Record #:
36309
Author(s):
Abstract:
Giving a considerable kick-start to America’s economy and job development is small businesses. Experts are hopeful the recent uptick in entrepreneurial ventures will bring the needed economic and occupational boost. The author believes this trend’s continuation includes making establishment of innovative and disruptive businesses possible for the next generation. Hood believed this was possible through activities such as entrepreneurship education programs through 4-H clubs and the Raleigh Children’s Business Fair.
Record #:
38071
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Abstract:
Conservation and education and practices in Catawba County is being perpetuated by school officials, teachers, 4-H Club leaders, and sportsmen.
Record #:
38192
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Camp Millstone Rock in the Sandhills Wildlife Management Area held the annual 4-H wildlife conference, where representatives of various resource commissions discussed wildlife topics with children and teenagers.
Record #:
38195
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Abstract:
In order to become more aware of the nature around them, children who attended the 4-H Wildlife Conference Camp at Camp Millstone spent an afternoon finding 75 objects from a list to display at a central location.
Record #:
38200
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Each member of the Busy Bee 4-H Club conducted a wildlife conservation project related to the Pisgah National Forest.
Record #:
38766
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Abstract:
Winners of the Wildlife Contest were able to attend the annual 4-H Wildlife Camp where children are able to learn about wildlife and conservation.