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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Pollination by insects
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Record #:
2954
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two parasitic bee mite species that entered the country recently have destroyed 30% (50,000) of the managed honeybee colonies and 90% of the wild bee colonies in the state. Loss of bees threatens pollination of commercial and wild plants.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 44 Issue 3, Summer 1996, p16, il
Record #:
3830
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's wild honeybees have been all but wiped out. Trachea and varroa mites, which appeared in the 1990s, in addition to pesticide use, have devastated the wild bee and over 50,000 managed bee colonies. Such loses affect pollination, which in turn affects fruit and plant growth.
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Record #:
20978
Author(s):
Abstract:
Honeybees are in trouble nationwide. Over 90 percent of the feral bee colonies have been decimated, and the state's managed colonies have declined about 50 percent since the 1980s. Kemp examines some of the reasons for this. Pollination for crops is essential and farmers have to import colonies during the blooming season. Kemp discusses the benefits of backyard beekeeping.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 14 Issue 2, Sum 2006, p9-11, il
Record #:
24037
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bee City USA is a program under the Center for Honeybee Research, a non-profit organization in Asheville. The program seeks to protect native pollinators and raise awareness about the importance of bees, populations of which have been shrinking as a result of pesticides and lack of nearby crop diversity.
Record #:
29681
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fall-blooming perennials provide pollen and nectar for the bees and beautiful flowers for the garden. Diane Almond, a North Carolina Master Beekeeper, discusses how to create a pollinator garden and offers a list of native plants to grow. Plants native to North Carolina include flowers such as asters, swamp thistle, goldenrod, and chrysanthemums.
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Record #:
29835
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bee City USA is an Asheville-based organization that continues to galvanize communities across the country to foster pollinator-friendly landscapes and gardens that provide essential habitat to bees and other pollinators. This June, Bee City USA-certified communities and beekeepers are celebrating Pollinator Week by hosting educational events dedicated to all things pollinator.
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Record #:
34385
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ben Rose of Roper is a master beekeeper and his honeybees are a crucial link in the development of a wide variety of crops. Without bees to pollinate the plants, there would be nothing to harvest. As one of the few commercial beekeepers in North Carolina, Rose transports his bees to various locations where crops need pollinating.
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Record #:
36589
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sharing genetic material with the Scutellata, the bees Sean Collingsworth keeps are the Italian and Carniolan varieties. His relatively harmless hive dwellers, supping on nectar untainted by pesticides, produce what he touted as honey high in quality because of its purity.